I have to lead arvit for my grandmother’s memorial on Wednesday. I know before mourners Kaddish is recited at the beginning of davening, the hazzan says a sentence that ends with something like “...Torah VeYadir.” I cant find that sentence in a siddur. Does anyone know what it is?

I think this is mainly a Persian / Sephardic custom.

  • 1
    The community may decide to close this question to answers so that you don't come to rely on those answers: practical questions should be addressed to your own rabbi (or in this case maybe gabbai). That said, I'm unfamiliar personally with a specific custom to say "... Tora v'yaadir" before maariv (=arvit); but I am familiar with a common practice of saying that after Torah study and before the so-called rabbis' kaddish. Perhaps that's done before maariv in your synagogue: again, best to ask your local authority. – msh210 Nov 11 at 23:47
  • Thank you. I now realize it is part of Kaddish D'Rabbanan which I always thought was part of maariv, and since the mourners present are the ones who recite it in my synagogue, this is where my confusion came from. – M. Yisrael Nov 15 at 0:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm familiar with this custom in Chabad shuls to recite this mishna (Mikvaos 7:7) at the end of davening (after Aleinu, mourners' kaddish, and "al tirah") in memory of the deceased:

mishna Mikvaos 7:7

After reciting that mishnah, the passage "Rabbi Chananiya" is recited, followed by Kadish DeRabanan:

Rabbi Chananiya

In my experience it's all read super fast and slurred together, so it's hard to catch what's being said.

Edit

You mentioned that this is before mourners' kaddish at the beginning of davening. I'm not familiar with any nusach that has a mourners' kaddish at that point; however, many synagogues have a short bit of Torah learning between mincha and maariv when they're recited together. After this, the passage Rabbi Chananiya from above would be said followed by kaddish DeRabanan.

  • this is it, thank you. – M. Yisrael Nov 12 at 3:09

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