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I am looking for a good edition of Miqraot gedolot (either hebrew-english or only english doesn't matter). What are the best editions for that ? And if somebody gives me an opinion about the JPS miqraot gedolot would be a plus.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Salmononius2, robev, Joel K, sabbahillel, DonielF Nov 5 '18 at 18:04

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  • As I understand you're rather interested in the quality of the translation, right? – Kazi bácsi Nov 5 '18 at 14:42
  • @Kazibácsi both the translation and the content – mil Nov 5 '18 at 15:00
  • Although it's hard to come up with a good product recommendation question at MY, you should better define your criteria for choosing a particular edition. Here's another question to get inspiration. – Kazi bácsi Nov 5 '18 at 20:30
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Mikraos Gedolos was first used to describe the Bomberg/Venice 1516-17 Edition of the Tanakh (source Wikipedia). It was edited by Yaakov ben Chayyim who was slated to be a Masoretic Scholar. In this sense then Mikraos Gedolos became synonymous with a.) accuracy to the ben Asher Masoretic text and b.) the Rabbinic Bible. When scholars wanted an accurate Hebrew text, they used the Rabbinic Bible - Mikraos Gedolos edition.

Today, Mikraos Gedolos is generally perceived to be an Edition with many of the major Commentators on the Masoretic text accepted by Jewish scholars.

Due to the nature of printing, these do not have English, but a plethora of commentaries on the text.

While for years, the Leningrad Codex 19a was used as a standard on which the Masoretic text was based. This is is now changing with the AramKeter using the Aleppo Codex with the annotations of Rabbi Yosef Breurer.

If you want a text that reflects the most recent discoveries with regard to the Masoretic text - using the Aleppo Codex, you should be using the Hebrew University's AramKeter and Mikraos Gedolos project.

If you are looking for a good text that has the most amount of commentaries, then the Oz V'Hadar edition of the Mikraos Gedolos for the Torah is excellent.

Artscroll Mesora have also produced their own Mikraos Gedolos set of the entire Tanakh.

As regards the rest of Nach, the Artscroll has an excellent edition. The Meor edition of Nach has been the standard for a good 10 years or so.

If you're looking for a good English translation, then accuracy to the text is probably best reflected in the Koren Jerusalem Tanakh. This is not a Mikraos Gedolos, but has a good rendition of the Hebrew.

If you're looking for a readable English version that is faithful to Rashi and the standard Jewish commentators, then the Artscroll Tanakh is excellent.

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    I heard that the ArtScroll Mikraos Gedolos used censored versions of some of the meforshim. Is this true? Either way, they are still a tremendous resource and beautiful volumes, with maps, charts, etc. in the back of the books. – ezra Nov 5 '18 at 17:12
  • censored by whom? what is the source for this? – user18155 Nov 5 '18 at 20:36
  • I have news for you, as long as you're not looking at manuscripts, all texts are edited, weighed up and analyzed by people which is a form of censorship. – user18155 Nov 5 '18 at 20:37
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Your best bet in English is going to be the Judaica Press Prophets and Writings. As far as the Chumash is concerned I don't think they have any of the books in this series save Genesis.

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