2

Is there any halachic requirement for the Shema to be recited in Hebrew only? I searched to make sure this was not a duplicate question and only found one that asks when reciting the Shema in English one should add Kel Melech Ne'eman when praying without a minyan. My question is simply about language only.

6

Berachot 13a

ת"ר ק"ש ככתבה דברי רבי וחכ"א בכל לשון מ"ט דרבי אמר קרא והיו בהוייתן יהו ורבנן מאי טעמייהו אמר קרא שמע בכל לשון שאתה שומע ולרבי נמי הא כתיב שמע ההוא מבעי ליה השמע לאזניך מה שאתה מוציא מפיך

Our Rabbis taught: The Shema’ must be recited as it is written. So Rabbi. The Sages, however, say that it may be recited in any language. What is Rabbi's reason? — Scripture says: and they shall be, implying, as they are they shall remain. What is the reason of the Rabbis? — Scripture says ‘hear’, implying, in any language that you understand. Rabbi also must see that ‘hear’ is written? — He requires it [for the lesson]: Make your ear hear what your mouth utters. (Soncino translation)

A few pages later, we find both disputants in another tannaic debate agreeing to the Sages' exposition that Shema can be recited in any language:

Berachot 15a

מאי טעמא דר' יוסי משום דכתיב שמע השמע לאזנך מה שאתה מוציא מפיך ות"ק סבר שמע בכל לשון שאתה שומע ור' יוסי תרתי שמע מינה

What is R. Jose's reason? — Because it is written, ‘Hear’ which implies, let your ear hear what you utter with your mouth. The first Tanna, however, maintains that ‘hear’ means, in any language that you understand. But R. Jose derives both lessons from the word. (Soncino translation)

Rambam rules like the Sages that Shema can be said in any language. However, he cautions that it must be said properly in that language:

Hilchot Keriat Shema 2:10

קורא אדם את שמע בכל לשון שיהיה מבינה והקורא בכל לשון צריך להזהר מדברי שבוש שבאותו הלשון ומדקדק באותו הלשון כמו שמדקדק בלשון הקדש

A person may recite the Shema in any language he understands. One who recites in a foreign language must be as scrupulous in his enunciation as if he were reciting it in the Holy Tongue. (Touger translation)

The other major codes of law rule accordingly:

Tur O.C. 62

ונקראת בכל לשון דדרשינן שמע בכל לשון שאתה שומע וכתב הרמב"ם ז"ל הקורא בכל לשון צריך ליזהר מדברי שיבוש שבאותו לשון וידקדק באותו לשון כמו בלשון הקדש

And it can be read in any language, for we expound "shema" [to mean] in any language that you understand. And Rambam writes that one who reads it in any language needs to be careful of the mistakes of that language, and be precise in that language as in Hebrew.

Shulchan Aruch O.C. 62:2

יכול לקרותה בכל לשון ויזהר מדברי שיבוש שבאותו לשון וידקדק בו כמו בלשון הקודש

One can read it in any language, and he should be careful of the mistakes of that language.

Levush O.C. 62:2

ויכול לקרותב בכל לשון דשמע פירושו הוא בכל לשון שאתה שומע ר"ל מבין רק יזהר ג"כ מדברי שיבוש שבאותו לשון וידקדק בו כמו בלשון הקדש שאמרנו

And one can read it in any language, because the meaning of "shema" is any language that you can hear, i.e. understand. But one should also be careful of the mistakes of that language, and be precise in it as in Hebrew, as we have said.

Aruch Hashulchan O.C. 62:3

יכול לקרותה בכל לשון דכתיב שמע בכל לשון שאתה שומע ויזהר מדברי שיבוש שבאותו לשון וידקדק בו כמו בלשון הקודש ודוקא כשמבין הלשון

One can read it in any language, as it is written "shema" [which we expound to mean] any language that you can hear. And one should be careful of the mistakes of that language, and be precise in it as in Hebrew. And this is only if he understands that language.

However, various later authorities have argued that nowadays one should not recite Shema in any other language because we don't know how to accurately translate it:

Aruch Hashulchan O.C. 62:4

ודע דזה דק"ש ותפלה נאמרת בכל לשון ודאי זהו כשמעתיק ממש כל הג' פרשיות וכל השמ"ע להלשון האחר דאל"כ אין זו ק"ש ותפלה ולפ"ז אין דין זה אלא בזמן המשנה והגמרא שהיו יודעים בטוב לשונינו והיו יכולים להעתיקו אבל עכשיו ידוע שכמה ספיקות יש לנו בפירוש המלות ונחלקו בו המפרשים

And know that this that Keriat Shema and prayer can be said in any language is certainly [only] when all three chapters and all 18 blessings are exactly translated into the other language. For if it is not done so then it's not [actually] Keriat Shema or prayer. And according to this, this law is only [applicable] in the times of the Mishnah and the Gemara when they knew well our language and were able to translate it. But now it is known that we have many uncertainties in the meaning of the words, and the commentaries are in dispute over [the meanings].

Mishnah Berurah 62:3

ועיין בספרי האחרונים דבימינו אף מצד הדין יש ליזהר שלא לקרותה בלשון אחר כ"א בלשון הקודש כי יש כמה וכמה תיבות שאין אנו יודעים איך להעתיקם היטב

And look in the books of the later authorities, that in our day even according to the actual law one should be careful to not read it in another language other than Hebrew, because there are many words which we don't know how to translate properly.

4

Mishna Sotah 7:1

אֵלּוּ נֶאֱמָרִין בְּכָל לָשׁוֹן, פָּרָשַׁת סוֹטָה, וּוִדּוּי מַעֲשֵׂר, קְרִיאַת שְׁמַע, וּתְפִלָּה, וּבִרְכַּת הַמָּזוֹן, וּשְׁבוּעַת הָעֵדוּת, וּשְׁבוּעַת הַפִּקָּדוֹן:

The following are said in any language: the paragraph of Sotah (Numbers 5:19-22), declaration of tithes (Deuteronomy 26:13), the recitation of Shema (Deuteronomy 6:4-9), prayer, the blessing after a meal, the oath of testimony, and the oath of a deposit.

One would probably still want to use Hebrew if one can for any of a number of reasons (eg. tradition, mystical significance of the Hebrew language, difficulty in finding a completely accurate translation) but in principle saying it in English, at least if one understands English, is valid.

4

There is a beginner's guide to Shema on the aish.com website where it says:

The important thing is to understand and concentrate on the meaning of the words. If you don't understand Hebrew, you can say it in English as well. And then make it a goal to learn the pronunciation and meaning to be able to say it in Hebrew as well.

There is a long article on this question here .

Key points are:

1] הרמב”ם (הלכות קריאת שמע, פרק ב, הלכה י) פוסק כדעת חכמים, ומוסיף פרט חשוב: “קורא אדם את שמע בכל לשון שיהיה מבינה, והקורא בכל לשון צריך להיזהר מדברי שיבוש שבאותו הלשון, ומדקדק באותו הלשון כמו שמדקדק בלשון הקודש”. לדעת הרמב”ם, צריך אדם לדקדק בקריאת שמע בלעז, כמו שמדקדק בתיבות של לשון הקודש. הראב”ד משיג על דבריו אלו: “אין זה מקובל על הדעת, לפי שכל הלשונות פירוש הן, ומי ידקדק אחר פירושו”.

1] Rambam allows Shema in a language you understand, pronounced accurately. The Raavad disagrees because an accurate translation is impossible.

2] המשנה ברורה (סימן סב, ס”ק ג) פוסק שיש להימנע מקריאת שמע בשאר לשונות בזמן הזה, ומעורר שמא אין לקרוא בלעז בזמן הזה מעיקר הדין: “ועיין בספרי האחרונים דבימינו אף מצד הדין יש ליזהר שלא לקרותה בלשון אחר, כי אם בלשון הקודש, כי יש כמה וכמה תיבות שאין אנו יודעים איך להעתיקם היטב, כגון תיבת ושננתם יש בו כמה ביאורים, אחד לשון לימוד ואחד לשון חידוד, כמו שאמרו חז”ל ‘שיהו ד”ת מחודדין בפיך, שאם ישאלך אדם דבר אל תגמגם ותאמר לו’. וכן כמה וכמה תיבות שבקריאת שמע שאין אנו יודעין היטב ביאורו על לשון אחר, כגון תיבת ‘את’ ותיבת ‘לטוטפות’, וכדומה”.

2] Mishnah Berurah advises against reciting shema other than in Hebrew. There are words in it with mutiple translations and words without a definite translation.

3] From the Yerushalmi, some bring the law that if one can read the shema in Hebrew one will not perform the mitzvah if it is done in any other language.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .