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On Shabbat Mevarchim, Birkas Hachodesh, a prayer announcing when the Rosh Chodesh will be, is said after Kriat Hatorah before Mussaf, containing the following line (with some variations depending on the particular nusach):

ראשׁ חדֶשׁ פלוני יִהְיֶה בְּיום פלוני הַבָּא עָלֵינוּ וְעַל כָּל יִשרָאֵל לְטובָה

When Rosh Chodesh will be for two days, both are mentioned:

ראשׁ חדֶשׁ פלוני יִהְיֶה בְּיום פלוני וּבְּיום פלוני הַבָּא(ים) עָלֵינוּ וְעַל כָּל יִשרָאֵל לְטובָה

This past Shabbat, being Shabbat Mevarchim when Rosh Chodesh will be on the following Shabbat and Sunday, a member of the congregation reproved the Chazzan, who used the above nusach, claiming that when Rosh Chodesh will be on the following Shabbat and Sunday the nusach is changed slightly, and should be the following:

ראשׁ חדֶשׁ פלוני יִהְיֶה בְּיום פלוני ולמחרתו בְּיום פלוני הַבָּא(ים) עָלֵינוּ וְעַל כָּל יִשרָאֵל לְטובָה

I had never heard of this before, but are there any sources which discuss the proper nusach for such a situation?

  • "Rosh Chodesh will be on the following Shabbat and Sunday" No, the following Sunday was not Rosh Chodesh. – Double AA Aug 7 '18 at 4:10
  • @DoubleAA When listing two consecutive days, the second usually refers to the day immediately following the first. – Ploni Aug 7 '18 at 4:27
  • @Ploni It’s still a bit of a misleading line. I think AA’s answer is the correct one, and the better question IMHO is what’s the justification for not saying ולמחרתו. – DonielF Aug 7 '18 at 6:16
  • @Ploni when they are consecutive sure, but these aren't consecutive. Did you mean specifically the Sunday following Shabbat? When you say "the Sunday following Shabbat" you remove all ambiguity. – Double AA Aug 7 '18 at 11:19
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    @DonielF exactly my point. That's why I don't see what the problem is in saying this. And, as I stated, I've heard just about every Chazan always say it. It makes sense and avoids all ambiguities, besides being a good habit. Though, IMO, anyone that is really confused should just view the calendar, or ask his neighbor in English, Yiddish or Yeshivish. – DanF Aug 7 '18 at 17:26

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