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I understand that there is a rule (with rare exceptions) that a single word cannot bear two Masoretic accents. However, I have not seen 1 Sam. 20:25 listed as one of the exceptions:

וַיֵּ֣שֶׁב הַ֠מֶּלֶךְ עַל־מ֨וֹשָׁב֜וֹ כְּפַ֣עַם ׀ בְּפַ֗עַם אֶל־מוֹשַׁב֙ הַקִּ֔יר וַיָּ֨קָם֙ יְה֣וֹנָתָ֔ן וַיֵּ֥שֶׁב אַבְנֵ֖ר מִצַּ֣ד שָׁא֑וּל וַיִּפָּקֵ֖ד מְק֥וֹם דָּוִֽד׃

And the king sat upon his seat, as at other times, even upon the seat by the wall; and Jonathan stood up, and Abner sat by Saul's side; but David's place was empty.

I have also read that azla "occasionally replaces metheg to mark secondary stress," but I am not confident that this can logically apply here (if so how?).

What I wasn't understanding was that, with the preposition joined by maqqef, the "secondary accent" syllable receiving the kadma is not "the first syllable of the word." For Wickes, p. 113, says, "Azla may take the place of light Metheg in the same word with Geresh (only of course not on the first letter)." If this is a valid rule, then the word moshav with the two accents would be illegal, but I suppose `al-moshav is another animal.

How common is the phenomenon exemplified by the accentuation of the word moshav here?

  • Welcome to Mi Yodeya! Please take a look at our tour when you get a chance where you’ll find some useful information about the site. More directly related to your question: where do you know this rule from? And where do you see this list of exceptions? Maybe it’s just not typically done, but it’s okay when it is? – DonielF Jul 3 '18 at 0:41
  • I'm not sure what you find confusing about your rule. There would be a secondary accent on מו and it converts to an Kadma as you said – Double AA Jul 3 '18 at 0:47
  • Thank you. I suppose what I wasn't understanding was that, with the preposition joined by maqqef, the "secondary accent" syllable receiving the kadma is not "the first syllable of the word." For Wickes, p. 113, says, "Azla may take the place of light Metheg in the same word with Geresh (only of course not on the first letter." If this is a valid rule, then the word moshav with the two accents would be illegal, but I suppose `al-moshav is another animal. – T.W. Jul 3 '18 at 0:58
  • Kadma V'azla appears numerous times on the same word throughout Tanac"h. These two notes are "pairs", as are a number of others. It's not unusual to see trope pairs on the same word. In this week's parsha (Pinchas), see Bemidbar 28:26. You'll see two words each with two notes. – DanF Jul 3 '18 at 14:09
  • Thank you for the Bemidbar 28:26 reference. In both of those examples, a word of 3+ syllables more naturally needs a secondary accent. I still do wonder how common it can be to have a trope pair on a two-syllable word like "moshav." But my question is effectively answered--it turns out to be a very ignorant one, as I am only starting to notice the less frequent features of the trope! – T.W. Jul 4 '18 at 3:12

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