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In what case is stealing permissible in Judaism? For example, is it a sin for a Jew to steal in case he doesn't have an income or a job? (and of course it is hard or impossible to find an alternative)

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    Similar judaism.stackexchange.com/q/92443/759 – Double AA Jun 11 '18 at 1:14
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    Welcome to MiYodeya Jerold and thanks for this first question. Great to have you learn with us! – mbloch Jun 11 '18 at 3:14
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    The question and the body make things ambiguous. Are you asking when someone is allowed to steal, or if a poor person may steal if he has no income or job? (I.e., you're excluding a working person who just happens to have no money, currently.) Please be as specific as possible. As it is currently phrased, there are other possibilities, that I haven't mentioned. – DanF Jun 11 '18 at 15:33
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I disagree with the example suggested, in a case where the person doesn't have an income or a job.

There is a Talmudic principle, that (generally speaking) laws of the Torah can only be abrogated in the case of "Pikuch Nefesh", when there is immediate danger to a person's life.

Therefore I don't see how stealing would be permitted if a person is broke, and has no job. Since he can always try begging, by which he would get money in a legitimate manner, then the Pikuach Nefesh dispensation is inapplicable. The fact that he may be embarrassed to beg, doesn't give him license to steal.

A scenario where stealing would be permitted, is when a person's life is in danger, and by stealing he would alleviate that danger to his life.

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    What is your answer based on? The first two paragraphs especially are phrased as if you are just stating your opinion. – Alex Jun 12 '18 at 19:23
  • Paragraph 2 explains the first one. The answer is based on the Talmudic principle, that for the most part, laws of the Torah can only be abrogated in the case of "Pikuch Nefesh", when there is immediate danger to a persons life. Logic dictates, that if a person has an option of begging, by which he would get money in a legitimate manner, then the Pikuach Nefesh dispensation is inapplicable. – IsraelReader Jun 12 '18 at 22:00
  • You did not mention any Talmudic principle in your answer. If that's what your answer is based on you should edit it into the post. – Alex Jun 12 '18 at 22:34
  • Post was edited to reflect the Talmudic priciple. – IsraelReader Jun 12 '18 at 23:08

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