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Wikipedia says that the meaning of the phrase "‘arob", or "עָרוֹב", is disputed.

I have always been taught it as "flies" - and that's the word used by the NIVUK translation of Exodus 8:21. In the so-called Orthodox Jewish Bible, Shemot 8:21 it simply uses "arov", and in the so-called Complete Jewish Bible, Sh'mot 8:17 it says "swarms of insects".

Has there been any more recent interpretation of the word?

  • Did you mean to write Shemos 8:20 in those examples? – Dr. Shmuel Apr 2 '18 at 17:13
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    Possible dupe judaism.stackexchange.com/q/13458/759 – Double AA Apr 2 '18 at 17:14
  • @DoubleAA I was kinda hoping for a more modern look at this - has anything changed in 4 years? – Tim Apr 2 '18 at 17:22
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    Btw, the "Orthodox Jewish Bible" is not Orthodox at all. It's a Messianic publication guising as something Jewish (again)... – ezra Apr 2 '18 at 20:53
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    @Tim I’m pretty sure nothing’s changed about it in over 3300 years. – DonielF Apr 2 '18 at 20:54
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Jastrow, in accordance with the most common interpretation (as brought from the Midrash, for instance), translates the word עָרוֹב as "various kinds of wild beasts".

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He does mention the possibilty of the word meaning "gadfly".

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  • The question was "Has there been any more recent interpretation of the word?". I don't see how this answers that. – msh210 Apr 2 '18 at 18:24
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    "the traditional Rabbinic interpretation" is there only one traditional Rabbinic interpretation? – Double AA Apr 2 '18 at 18:53
  • @DoubleAA *most common interpretation ^ See edit – ezra Apr 2 '18 at 20:54
  • Most common among what? Contemporary Jewish kindergartners? Rishonim? – Double AA Apr 2 '18 at 20:57

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