0

Does kashrut apply to the chemical composition of a food or only to its origin? Example: If you could manufacture a pork chop in the laboratory, and it had exactly the same chemical composition as a real pork chop, would it be kosher?
-One answer is yes: The Torah only says that pork as the flesh of pigs may not be eaten, but since pork manufactured chemically is not the flesh of pigs, it can be eaten.
-Another answer is no: The Torah may have prohibited pork for health reasons, in ways that we may not fully understand today, so you still may not eat anything that has the composition of pork, regardless of its source.
-What would be the halacha here?

6
  • 2
    "The Torah may have prohibited pork for health reasons, in ways that we may not fully understand today" - what does that have to do with the prohibition of eating pork? This reason alone would make it no worse than a 1000 calorie pastry with a hechsher on the package.
    – Heshy
    Mar 20 '18 at 20:14
  • Why ask about pork? We already have chemically identical things that can come from both kosher and non kosher sources. (eg. gelatin)
    – Double AA
    Mar 20 '18 at 20:15
  • @Double AA -- They are not chemically identical. Mar 20 '18 at 20:22
  • @msh210 are you sure this is a duplicate? This question seems to be specifically concerned with the special properties of pork, per se, whereas the other question is about non-kosher meat, in general.
    – Isaac Moses
    Mar 20 '18 at 20:22
  • @MauriceMizrahi No? What's the difference? What about various lipids? We can't isolate the same particular lipid from both lard and suet?
    – Double AA
    Mar 20 '18 at 20:24

Browse other questions tagged .