3

I’ve been invited to a home Seder this month, and would like to bring something. Someone suggested I bring some unleavened crackers. I was raised Jewish, but never kept kosher, or even observed the holidays very much.

I was taught that the reason unleavened bread is eaten at Passover is that when the Hebrews were fleeing Egypt they had no time to let their bread rise. Eating only unleavened bread is in remembrance of that. But chemically leavened crackers don’t have any rise time, so...

I know there are plenty of recipes out there for artisanal crackers with no leavening, but I was hoping to try something a little different.

So that is my question: are chemically leavened crackers (or breads, for that matter) kosher for Passover?

  • 2
    There are various levels of 'kosher' and 'pareve'. For instance, some people might object to eating food from a non-kosher kitchen. Or even a kosher kitchen that wasn't specially cleaned for passover. You really have to ask the people that you're going to be serving. – Joe Mar 12 '18 at 18:34
  • 1
    By the way, "pareve" doesn't mean "kosher for Passover": it means (roughly) "containing no meat, poultry, or milk". – msh210 Mar 12 '18 at 20:28
  • 2
    You should only bring sealed packages that are marked kosher for Passover in any case. If they are not marked as kosher at all, they would not be allowed at any time. Since you do not keep kosher, do not bring anything cooked in your kitchen. – sabbahillel Mar 12 '18 at 20:49
  • 1
    I think it is great that you are attending a Seder this year. May I suggest that you simply bring a store bought traditional Kosher for Passover food that you yourself may never have eaten? Rather than trying to be untraditional, consider the possibility that your Seder experience might be more meaningful and enjoyable if you simply go with the cliches of the holiday. Enjoy the Seder. – JJLL Mar 12 '18 at 22:51