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I find the Jewish Encyclopedia (1901-1906) to be an invaluable resource but alas it is quite old. Is there a similar but more updated encyclopedia available online anywhere?

  • Old is not necessarily bad. – ezra Jan 11 '18 at 1:09
  • @ezra I hope I didn't suggest that it was. – Ruminator Jan 11 '18 at 4:03
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    Well I suppose there would be benefits to an updated publication. The Jewish Encyclopedia mentions nothing about the State of Israel and how that impacted Jewish history because it was the very early 1900s. – ezra Jan 11 '18 at 5:11
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    @ezra -- Nor does it mention the Holocaust/Shoah. – Clifford Durousseau Jan 11 '18 at 10:34
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The Encyclopedia Judaica, first published in 1971-1972, and updated as recently as 2007, is a bit more recent than Jewish Encyclopedia. While it isn't available online, many of its articles are available from Jewish Virtual Library (most of these articles have "Source: Encyclopaedia Judaica" at the bottom, but some articles from Encyclopedia Judaica are uncredited).

  • @b a -- For some reason, many articles are those of EJ but are not credited to it. See, for example, 'New Testament' and 'Jesus'--both by Dr. David Flusser of Hebrew University--and 'Daniel, Book of' by H. L. Ginsberg. – Clifford Durousseau Jan 12 '18 at 11:59
  • @CliffordDurousseau That's strange. I couldn't figure out why from the website, but I updated the answer with your observation – b a Jan 12 '18 at 12:30
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Also available is Universal Jewish Encyclopedia, 10 volumes (1939-1943) by Simon Cohen and Isaac Landman at The Online Books Page (onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/).* After entering title, click 'Include extended shelves' when you get the result. Only volumes 2, 5, 6, and 10 have been digitized by Hathi Digital Library. Thus it is only partly comparable in usefulness to EJ.

The New Jewish Encyclopedia (1962) edited by Dr. David Bridger and Rabbi Samuel Wolk is accessible through Amazon.com's Look Inside feature. Ditto for The Shengold Jewish Encyclopedia (Revised 3rd edition; 2003) by Mordechai Schreiber and Leon Klenicki. These both are one-volume works and lack the scholarly bibliographies of the multi-volume JE, UJE, and EJ.


*The Encyclopedia of Jewish Knowledge (1934), a one-volume work edited by Jacob De Haas 'in collaboration with more than one hundred and fifty scholars,' is available at Internet Archive (https://archive.org/stream/encyclopediaofje00unse/encyclopediaofje00unse_djvu.txt). But Jewish Quarterly Review devastatingly critiqued it for its numerous inaccuracies in a three-page review in 1937: https://www.jstor.org/stable/1452466enter link description here.

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