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There is a world famous Jewish speaker who believes in Torah Misinai and the like but only keeps the Rabbinic laws that make sense to him. For example, he does not keep Yom Tov Sheini in Chutz La'aretz. Would someone like that be considered a Apikores?

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According to the Rambam the category of Epicurus includes those who "dispute [the authority of the Oral Torah's] spokesmen" (Mishneh Torah, Hilchos Teshuvah 3:8). It is very difficult to argue that one who rejects the Rabbinic authority to enact binding legislation in direct opposition to their professed authority isn't disputing the spokesmen of the Oral Torah.

Mishneh Torah, Teshuvah 3:8

  • How does this apply to the OPs case? I don't see anything in the question about authority – Double AA Jan 4 '18 at 4:49
  • The distinction you wish to make, that this individual could conceivably recognize their authority but break it in a systematic fashion, is asinine. – Yirmeyahu Jan 4 '18 at 4:55
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    The Rambam lists this individual as a Kofer, and with his examples of Tzaddok and Baisus he seems to imply that this is referring to derashos rather than d’Rabbanans. -1 for inaccurately portraying the Rambam as saying something he doesn’t. – DonielF Jan 4 '18 at 5:48
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    @Yirmeyahu Notice back in 3:6 that he lists all of the different categories that he’ll be subsequently expounding upon. It is a valid question that’s bothered me for some time why indeed he lumps together Apikores and Kofer into the same Halacha rather than splitting them into two separate ones. (Same question can be asked on 3:11.) – DonielF Jan 4 '18 at 6:03
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    @DonielF Note that the Mechon Mamre edition splits 3:8 and 3:11 of the usual printed editions, each into two Halakhot, 3:16-17 and 3:20-21 respectively. – Tamir Evan Feb 9 '18 at 14:00

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