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I am an Italian son of Noah.

Reading the book of the prophet Malachi, I note that verse 2:16 presents two radically different translations,both carried out in Jewish contexts.

Translation reported on the website www.chabad.org:

“If you hate [her], send [her] away, says the Lord God of Israel. For injustice shall cover his garment, said the Lord of Hosts, but you shall beware of your spirit, and do not deal treacherously.”

Translation reported on the website www.sefaria.org:

“For I detest divorce—said the LORD, the God of Israel—-and covering oneself with lawlessness as with a garment—said the LORD of Hosts. So be careful of your life-breath and do not act treacherously”

The meaning changes radically between the two translations. Which is the one that according to Jewish tradition is to be considered the most reliable?

The meaning "I detest divorce" seems to me hardly compatible with the wide interpretation given by Beit Hillel regarding the "ervat davar" clause in Deuteronomy 24: 1,while Beit Shammai's more restrictive position on the subject would appear to me to be more coherent.

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    Clearly there are multiple differences between these two translations. Is there one particular point of difference that you are focused on? – mevaqesh Dec 31 '17 at 19:02
  • @meqavesh - The meaning "I detest divorce" seems to me hardly compatible with the wide interpretation given by Beit Hillel regarding the "ervat davar" clause in Deuteronomy 24: 1,while Beit Shammai's more restrictive position on the subject would appear to me to be more coherent – Amos74 Dec 31 '17 at 19:27
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    Ok consider editing that into the post. – mevaqesh Dec 31 '17 at 19:35
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    Even though we follow Beit Hillel and divorce is allowed for any reason, that doesn't mean it's a good thing. More an unfortunate necessity. – Heshy Jan 1 '18 at 11:57
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The meaning of this verse is discussed in the last page of Gitin (English). The translation on chabad.org, "If you hate [her], send [her] away" follows the opinion of Rabbi Yehuda, who interprets the verse in exactly those words: "If you hate her, send her away."

Rabbi Yochanan interprets the verse, "One who sends away is hated" (or in the variant quoted in Mesorat Hashas as well as Rashi: "If she is hated by God, send her away"). According to the Gemara, Rabbi Yehuda and Rabbi Yochanan's opinions can be reconciled: The opinion that "one who sends away is hated" refers to one's first marriage, and "if you hate her, send her away"/"If she is hated by God, send her away" refers to one's second marriage.

The translation "For I detest divorce" on sefaria.org more closely follows Rabbi Yochanan (though not literally), and is also closer to the literal meaning of the Hebrew (following the Masoretic vowelization). The reason why the chabad.org translation follows the opinion of Rabbi Yehuda is probably because that is the opinion quoted by Rashi on the verse, although Rashi on that verse also mentions that there is a dispute.

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