7

Is there a proper and respectful means of disposal of old kippot? I have lots lying around. I set aside many of them that are dingy and aren't ever going to be worn again by anyone. What can I do with them?

11

Kippot do not have any inherent holiness to them and may be disposed in your regular trash. Sources: shaimos.org, Star-K

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    Is this true across all denominations? I'm conservative. Will this also be the case for more observant than me? – itsmikem Dec 25 '17 at 17:45
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    As far as I know. I am orthodox and based on Halacha, you are allowed to dispose of Kippot. – user218076 Dec 25 '17 at 17:48
  • The answer would be much better with sources. – ezra Dec 25 '17 at 21:33
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    @ezra Just updated my answer with sources. – user218076 Dec 25 '17 at 21:46
5

user218076's answer is correct. But, as you also asked "What can I do with them?" you could donate them to a shul, esp. a Conservative or Reform shul. Depending on the kippa style, they may want some or all of them.

Another good donation place is a yeshiva elementary school. While this may sound counter-intuitive, little kids have a habit of losing, misplacing them or just plain not bothering to show up to school wearing one. Yeshiva rebbes are extremely insistent on kids wearing one at all times. So, the principal's office and rebbe's should have an ample spare supply. Believe me, when I was a kid, one time they sent me home all because I forgot to wear my kippah. It took my grandma to yell at the principal to keep a supply in his drawer. So, if you don't mind, you can "salvage" my youth horror story :-)

Religious summer camps have a similar problem as above, but in higher volume, because there are more sports (a game like basketball tends to create kippa fly-aways!) and camp bunks create a higher likelihood of lost kippot (Sad to say, but even Jewish religious kids, esp. in camp, steal stuff.)

A few communities such as mine have a religious online post forum where people post things they sell, donate or want. (Example: flatbushshuls@yahoo.com) If your community has such a forum, post that you are donating these. Last time I had a bag of about 50 kippot. I posted, and I was amazed how quickly various people came to my home to get some of them.

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    @mbloch Yes. Thanks for that reminder. I shall edit. – DanF Dec 25 '17 at 19:17
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    Because at an Orthodox shul, almost everyone will arrive with one already installed. – bimargulies Dec 25 '17 at 21:28
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    "esp. a Conservative or Reform shul." Wouldn't donating something to them be problematic? – ezra Dec 25 '17 at 21:34
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    @MonicaCellio exactly as bimarguiles indicated. Most Orthodox people are already entering shul with kippot. The shul "kippah supply box" is something I see almost uniquely in Conservative and Reform shuls; rarely in Orthodox shuls. Not to say that they shouldn't keep some around, but, typically, they don't. Re what I said about "style" - rarely have I seen Reform / Conservative shuls carry knit kippot. They seem to go for the "satin" dome-shaped ones. Perhaps, you or I should ask a question about how kippa styles seem to identify the religious group. – DanF Dec 26 '17 at 16:14
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    @ezra Oy! I know all about this debate. For whatever debate there is, the point is that they are davening something. We can separate all the other issues about their format, style, intent, mixed seating and whatever. In this case, I think let's give some merit to those that at least see the significance of wearing a kippa in shul. – DanF Dec 26 '17 at 19:13

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