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Bringing a korban these days is halachicly problematic for various reasons. (tumah, Kohen status, location, etc.). For these reasons, a convert is currently exempt from bringing a korban.

However, it seems to me that these issues might go away if the would-be convert brought the korban before he converted, as long as it doesn't somehow fall under "idol worship" (see also here).

There is a valid question as to the utility of such an offering. After all, there is no obligation for a non-jew to do so. On the other hand, we've seen historic instances of non-jews bringing offerings that are looked on with favor (e.g. Hevel), so one could argue that there is a net positive here. At the very least, it could provide practical experience (to onlookers) for when offerings are eventually reinstated.

To summarize, I am asking if there are any sources that discuss non-Jews bringing offerings in modern times and if this is considered a positive or objectionable idea.

  • "At the very least, it could provide practical experience (to onlookers) for when offerings are eventually reinstated." I don't think you need to jump through hoops to do that. You can just have in mind that it's not a korban (and make sure you're not violating any laws) and you're fine. Especially if you're doing a fake shelamim+variants/asham/non-Kohen mincha/standard non-bird chatas, you're not even wasting the meat, you can eat it. The parts that get burned are not kosher anyway. – Heshy Nov 22 '17 at 14:02
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    Yes gentiles can bring offerings nowadays judaism.stackexchange.com/a/45518/759 – Double AA Nov 22 '17 at 14:04
  • That's a good related question. I will add a link – Nic Nov 22 '17 at 17:12

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