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I'm looking for a good read which discusses archaeology and the Tanach, Chazal, etc. Could anyone point me to some resources? I would prefer that the book be in English, and have pictures throughout.

It would be best if the book was from a reliable Jewish source, not a scholarly one, so that there are minimal conflictions between the contents and traditional Jewish belief.

  • Read the distinguished William F. Albright's numerous books. – Oliver Nov 21 '17 at 1:20
  • @Oliver Not a Jewish source. – ezra Nov 21 '17 at 1:55
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    Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/40702/8775 – mevaqesh Nov 21 '17 at 2:01
  • @ezra Indeed he was not Jewish but was recognized by many Jewish scholars as a bona fide authority in the field. – Oliver Nov 21 '17 at 2:04
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    Not English, but this book is relevant. It has an nontraditional dating in a lot of cases, and I can't say how strong the argument is, but it's interesting to read their interpretation (e.g. they date the Amarna letters to Jeremiah's time, whereas the traditional date is around Joshua's) – b a Nov 21 '17 at 15:42
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Rabbi Michael Shelomo Bar-on actually wrote a book on this topic called Oral Torah from Sinai:The case for the authenticity of the Oral Torah relating to this topic. You can also see his works on Acaedemia.edu. Where he specializes in the topic of Archaeology and Tanach.

Additionally here is his personal website.

Hope this is helpful

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Not a book but otherwise fits exactly what you ask: R Amnon Bazak has a series of written shiurim on Tanakh and Archaeology in English, see shiurim 6a to 6i.

He offers a fairly comprehensive review of the archaeological record in regard to Tanakh. He states there is no archaeological evidence that contradicts the Torah - actually he writes there are many findings that do conform to the biblical narratives from the times of the forefathers and indicate that these narratives were indeed written with a profound familiarity with the period. He notes the same same regarding the era of enslavement and subsequent exodus from Egypt.

(from p. 102-103 in Reason to believe by R Chaim Jachter)


As a followup, I have now read Excavating the Bible: New Archaeological Evidence for the Historical Reliability of Scripture by Yitzhak Meitlis. The author is a religious Jew (and has a personal approbation from R Pinchas Stolper). The book focuses on retracing the Tanakh through excavations of the Judean Hills and Jerusalem. I found it enjoyable to read and it connects nicely the biblical text with the reality of excavations.

From amazon

He leads the reader on a lively exploration of the ancient cities of the Judean Hills, and the birth of an Israelite nation and the people’s challenge to remaining a people committed to God as described in the Prophets and later Writings. The journey culminates in Jerusalem, where the reader watches the rise and fall of one civilization after another; views the audacious exploits that delivered the city into the hands of David; pictures its glory at the height of its power; and watches in horror as it meets its fiery end.

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