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I'm currently involved in a research project about literacy in the Ancient Mediterranean, and I keep finding mentions of a passage in the Talmud referred to as [Ketubot 8:11 32c]. I checked Sefaria and other online Talmuds, but I can't find any that contain a passage with that numbering in Ketubot. Have I missed something fundamental about how the Talmud is ordered?

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It took a bit of detective work but I think it refers to the 8th chapter of Massekhet Ketubot in the Jerusalem Talmud, halacha (law) 11, see the original here.

If I google Ketubot 8:11 32c the way you have it, I find multiple references (e.g., bottom of here) to the verse from Deuteronomy 32:47 which is the one referred in the gemara above (the reference 32 appears in the margin of the gemara).

See the Sefaria version of the gemara here.

Puzzle solved I think.

(I am less clear how the gemara relates to the content of the article from where you took the reference. Not even sure this is the correct reference. Baba Batra 21a seems much more interesting re literacy in the Ancient Mediterranean. You will tell us I guess.)

  • Thanks! The part that I need seems to be in 50b, but that put me close enough to find it. One thing I still can't understand is why it would consistently be marked as 32c, even though every Talmudic numbering system I've seen only includes a and b. Bava Batra 21a is indeed of interest (especially the parts about class sizes, attitudes towards teachers, etc.), but I want to find sources from across multiple tractates, so I still have some digging to do. – Seanachai Nov 18 '17 at 21:37
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    The Venice edition of the Yerushalmi came with 4 columns per page. That's what 32c references: page 32 column 3. The Vilna edition used a different pagenation so people nowadays usually stick to Chapter and Halakha like 8:11, but this source was being extra clear I guess. Here's the original back side of page 32 in the Venice edition commons.wikimedia.org/w/… You'd want the right hand column, which is the third on the page (two on front, two on back). – Double AA Nov 18 '17 at 22:41

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