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Shalom friends do the Jews believe that prophet Jesus is their prophet do the Jews follow his teachings also what do the Jews think of prophet Jesus. Thank you Shalom.

marked as duplicate by Gershon Gold, DonielF, sabbahillel, mevaqesh, Shmuel Brin Aug 22 '17 at 0:40

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  • Please see related answer which also relates to Jesus...judaism.stackexchange.com/a/84918/7303 – Yaacov Deane Aug 21 '17 at 20:01
  • This is literally, word for word, this question, with Jesus put in where Muhammad is there. – DonielF Aug 21 '17 at 21:06
  • @DonielF - Not a dupe, because that question discusses whether or not he is Messiah, not whether or not we consider him a prophet. The answer is the same either way, though. :) – ezra Aug 21 '17 at 21:15
  • @ezra Maybe this one? – DonielF Aug 21 '17 at 21:16
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    I'm with @ezra how is this related to a Messiah related question? – robev Aug 22 '17 at 1:46
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Judaism does not consider Jesus to be a prophet. One major reason is that the era of prophecy ended well before Jesus was born

The era of prophecy officially came to an end some 23 centuries ago. The last generation of prophets were those who began to prophecy before the First Holy Temple was destroyed in 423 BCE, though a number of that generation survived the 70-year Babylonian exile and lived to see the building of the Second Temple. Most famously, Ezekiel prophesied in Babylonia, and three prophets, Chaggai, Zachariah and Malachi, were members of the "Great Assembly" that led the people in the first years of the return from Babylon. Mordechai and Esther were also members of the long-lived generation that mourned the destruction of the First Temple and witnessed the building of the second. With the demise of that generation, "prophecy departed from Israel."

In terms of your next questions, Jews mostly don't think of Jesus as he has no part in our daily way of living, so whatever his teachings might have been their are not relevant to Jews. The academic questions of whether he existed, whether he was a rabbi in any sense (or even Jewish) or if he was a political figure to anyone don't work their way into most people's life, day to day.

  • This is cute, but makes for a poor answer. All we have is Chabad.org claiming that the era of prophecy officially came to an end 23 centuries ago, whatever that even means. And citing no sources. Even if this were obviously rue (which it very much is not), it would not be a very strong answer. If this is the reason (I realise you only wrote 'one major reason) why Jews don't accept Christianity, Judaism is on pretty shaky ground (Luckily it isnt). – mevaqesh Aug 21 '17 at 22:16
  • @mevaqesh is there a post on this site where you clarify your claim about prophecy not having ended 23 centuries ago? – robev Aug 21 '17 at 23:19
  • At the minimum, Rambam writes that the messiah will be a prophet, so the loss isn't permanent anyway, and hence there is nothing (in this attending argument) to preclude Jesus from being a prophet. Note that in Rambams discussion of mohammed being a prophet or not, he makes no naturally claim that he can't be a prophet since "prophecy ended". – mevaqesh Aug 22 '17 at 0:07
  • All we have is Chabad, but they are referencing the talmud judaism.stackexchange.com/a/17729/1362 -- also, I didn;t say anything about reasons Jews do or do not accept Christianity. That wasn't what the question asked. Prophecy ended as per the gemara and will return in the case of the Messiah, and his era, but since the messiah hasn't come, Jesus is not part of that era. QED, not a prophet. – rosends Aug 22 '17 at 0:22
  • 423BCE? I thought it was 586BC, during Nebuchadnezzar's reign. I know some Jewish sources dispute the earlier date, but even the Dead Sea Scrolls folks knew 586 was correct, because the Damascus Document refers to "390 years after Nebuchadnezzer, etc" and then another 20 years before their Teacher arose, estimated at mid 2nd century BCE by most of the DSS scholars. That makes 410 years, so 423 would make the Teacher live around the turn of the Era, which is unlikely, since many of the sectarian scrolls have been dated earlier. – Gary Aug 22 '17 at 14:01
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With all due respect to a seeker of knowledge it is written in Numbers 23,19:

לֹ֣א אִ֥ישׁ אֵל֙ וִֽיכַזֵּ֔ב וּבֶן־אָדָ֖ם וְיִתְנֶחָ֑ם הַה֤וּא אָמַר֙ וְלֹ֣א יַעֲשֶׂ֔ה וְדִבֶּ֖ר וְלֹ֥א יְקִימֶֽנָּה׃ God is NOT MAN to be capricious, Or mortal to change His mind. Would He speak and not act, Promise and not fulfill?

This proves 2 points which you might have otherwise not known from your version of the Old testament:

  1. Jesus cannot be a godly entity rather he is an impostor by claiming so.

  2. G-d will never replace the Jews from being the chosen nation As He doesn't change His mind, and our very existence today proves so

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