8

On seven occasions, Moshe tells the Bnei Yisrael to kill a sinner and “destroy the evil from your midst” - ובערת הרע מקרבך. These seven occasions are (all sources are in Devarim):

  • Executing a Navi Sheker (13:6)
  • Executing idolaters (17:7)
  • Punishing Eidim Zomemim (19:19 - note that while this can be a capital crime it isn’t always)
  • Executing a Ben Sorer U’Moreh (21:21)
  • Executing a woman who cheated on her husband between Kiddushin and Nisuin (22:21)
  • Executing a Na’arah Me’orasah who was adulterous in the city and did not cry out for help (indicating that she consented), as well as the one who consorted with her (22:24)
  • Executing a kidnapper (24:7)

On two additional occasions this phrase is used, but with the word מישראל, “from Israel,” in place of מקרבך, “from your midst.” These are:

  • Executing a Zakein Mamrei (17:12)
  • Executing a married woman who cheated on her husband, as well as the man with whom she cheated (22:22)

Why are these nine cases singled out? There are plenty of capital crimes; why are these nine special that they get the additional phrase of “destroying evil”? Further, why are two of them switched from “destroying evil from your midst” to “destroying evil from Israel”?

  • Viewing the literal meanings, מישראל seems to be more general than מקרבך . Perhaps, מישראל includes the concept of being more aggressive and annihilating the criminal from even outside the land of Israel (e.g., the "fugitive" escapes to the lands of Gad and Menashe, etc.) whereas מקרבך may apply only to crimes committed within the land west of the Jordan, or cannot be applied to deporting a criminal who escapes to the eastern side. – DanF Nov 7 '18 at 17:28
2
+25

To start off, there is actually a third case where the Torah says מישראל rather than מקרבך. In Devarim 19:13, in reference to a murderer, the Torah says ובערת דם הנקי מישראל.

In his commentary to 22:22, R. Meir Simcha of Dvinsk explains why the Torah switches between מקרבך and מישראל. He states that when the Torah says to remove evil "from your midst" that would not necessarily be limited to Jews. If there was a ger toshav that committed the crime in question then the Torah would be obligating the Jewish courts to deal with the perpetrator, even though he is not Jewish.

However, we know (as ruled by Rambam in Hilchos Melachim 10:11) that the Jewish courts are only obligated to make sure that there is a court system for the non-Jews, but not to actually carry out justice themselves.

Now in the cases where the Torah says to remove the evil "from your midst" the crime is one that is only applicable to Jews. So there is no problem with saying "from your midst" which would imply that the Jewish courts have to enforce the law on non-Jews, because those crimes are only crimes for Jews in the first place. A non-Jew doing the same action would not be guilty of a crime and thus no punishment would be mandated to begin with.

However, verse 22:22 speaks about adultery. Adultery is a crime even for non-Jews. Thus, had the Torah used the term "from your midst" in 22:22 it would in effect be saying that the Jewish courts are obligated to punish even non-Jewish adulterers. But as we said above, that is not true — they only have to make sure that there is a justice system set up to deal with them. Therefore, in this case the Torah had to tell us to remove the evil "from Israel", meaning to say that the Jewish courts are only obligated to punish Jewish adulterers.

Similarly, verse 19:13 deals with murder, which is also a crime even for non-Jews. So once again, the Torah could not have used the term "from your midst" because that would imply that the Jewish courts have to punish even non-Jewish murderers, which is not true. Therefore, here too the Torah said "from Israel" in order to limit the scope to Jewish murderers.

As for 17:12, the reason there is a little different. The subject of that verse is the rebellious elder, the sage who contravenes the ruling of the Jewish court. If the Torah there had used the term "from your midst" you might have thought that the evil in question is only an evil perpetrated against the court, and, as such, the court can choose to forgive the rebellious elder. Therefore, the Torah had to use the term "from Israel" to inform us that this is in fact an evil perpetrated against Israel as a whole, for a rebellious elder contravening the court can tear apart the nation. Since this is actually an evil perpetrated against the entire nation, the court does not have the ability to forgive the rebellious elder.

Meshech Chochmah Devarim 22:22

ובערת הרע מישראל. בכולהו כתיב מקרבך דבמלת מקרבך לא נתמעט גר תושב דכתיב ביה בקרבך ישב ובאמת אין בית דין מצווים להרוג העו"ג החוטא כמו שמצווים בישראל כמו שחשב רמב"ם למצות עשה וכן כתב רבינו בהלכות מלכים חייבים בית דין לעשות שופטים לאלו הגרים התושבים (לדין להם על פי המשפטים האלו כדי שלא ישחת העולם אם ראו בית דין שיעמידו שופטיהם) מהם מעמידים (עכ"ל) הרי דבשופטים גויים סגי ונערה מאורסה ליכא בגוי וכן כולהו כמו בן סורר ומורה וכיוצא בזה לכן כתיב ובערת הרע מקרבך אבל בעולת בעל איכא גם בגוי ובן נח שבא על אשת חבירו חייב מיתה וסלקא דעתך אמינא שגם על גויים היינו גרי תושב מצווים בית דין להמיתו לכן כתיב ובערת הרע מישראל אבל בגר תושב אין אנו מצווים רק מפני השחתת העולם מעמידים להם בית דין שופטים אפילו מהם וכן ברוצח בשופטים כתיב ובערת דם הנקי מישראל וטוב לך הא בן נח שהרג חבירו אין מצווים בית דין להרגו אעפ"י שבן מיתה הוא והא דבזקן ממרה כתיב ובערת הרע מישראל נראה דבא לרמז שלא נאמר שזו רעה והעדר כבוד השופטים ואם רצו בית דין למחול מוחלים לו קמ"ל שזו רעה חולי מתפשטת בכלל האומה הישראלית שאם לא יבטל היחיד דעתו להרוב הגדולים באומה במקום האלקי תרבה הרעה ויעשו בני ישראל אגודות אגודות ויתפרד הקשר האמיץ אשר בו יתוארו גוי אחד בארץ ואם כן אין בכוח בית דין למחול וכן תנו רבנן סנהדרין פח ב על זקן ממרה לא הודו לו כדי שלא ירבו מחלוקות בישראל כי כבוד האומה וקיומה אין בידם למחול וכמו מלך שמחל על כבודו דאינו מחול כי כבודו הוא כבוד האומה וזה חלק גדול מכחות התאוה להיות מצויין וממציא דרך חדש ולהבדל מן הכלל השם ישמרנו

  • What about every other case, which says neither מקרבך nor מישראל? – DonielF Nov 12 '18 at 12:29
  • 1
    @DonielF This was primarily meant as an answer to your second question. In fact, at first I didn’t even notice the first question. – Alex Nov 12 '18 at 16:42
1

Fortunately someone once pointed me to a Meshech Chochma, seen here, who addresses the same observation you had in Ki Seitzei 22,22.

The Meshech Chachma has an intricate approach seen below, where he explains that the phrase ובערת הרע מישראל is coming to teach us that Beis Din does not kill a Ger Toshav for this sin. The instances where the phrase מקרבך was used were always laws that didn't apply to a Ger Toshav, so no special phrase was used to exclude Beis Din dealing with them.

He says the phrase found by Zakein Mamre is used in order to teach us that Beis Din can't forgive their honor and allow the Zakein Mamre to live as this will destroy the entire Bnei Yisroel.

ובערת הרע מישראל. בכולהו כתיב מקרבך דבמלת מקרבך לא נתמעט גר תושב, דכתיב ביה בקרבך ישב. ובאמת אין ב"ד מצווין להרוג העו"ג החוטא כמו שמצווין בישראל, כמו שחשב רמב"ם למצות עשה, וכן כתב רבינו בהלכות מלכים חייבין ב"ד לעמוד שופטים לאלו הגרים התושבים כו' מהם מעמידין, הרי דבשופטים גוים סגי, ונערה מאורסה ליכא בגוי, וכן כולהו כמו בן סו"מ וכיוצא בזה, לכן כתיב ובערת הרע מקרבך, אבל בעולת בעל איכא גם בגוי, ובן נח שבא על אשת חברו חייב מיתה וסד"א שגם על גוים היינו גרי תושב מצווים ב"ד להמיתו, לכן כתיב ובערת הרע מישראל, אבל בגר תושב אין אנו מצווים, רק מפני השחתת העולם מעמידין להם ב"ד שופטים אפילו מהם, וכן ברוצח בשפטים כתיב ובערת דם הנקי מישראל וטוב לך, הא בן נח שהרג חבירו אין מצווין ב"ד להרגו אעפ"י שבן מיתה הוא. והא דבזקן ממרה כתיב ובערת הרע מישראל נראה דבא לרמז שלא נאמר שזו רעה והעדר כבוד השופטים ואם רצו ב"ד למחול מוחלין לו, קמ"ל שזו רעה חולי מתפשטת בכלל האומה הישראלית, שאם לא יבטל היחיד דעתו להרוב הגדולים באומה במקום האלדי תרבה הרעה, ויעשו בנ"י אגודות אגודות ויתפרד הקשר האמיץ, אשר בו יתוארו גוי אחד בארץ, וא"כ אין בכח ב"ד למחול, וכן ת"ר סנהדרין פ"ח על זקן ממרה לא הודו לו כדי שלא ירבו מחלוקות בישראל, כי כבוד האומה וקיומה אין בידם למחול וכמו מלך שמחל על כבודו דאינו מחול, כי כבודו הוא כבוד האומה, וזה חלק גדול מכחות התאוה להיות מצויין וממציא דרך חדש ולהבדל מן הכלל השם ישמרנו.

  • Unfortunately, that same person also pointed to Shoftim 17,7 which is a question on the Meshech Chochma as a Ger Toshav it's certainly commanded against idolatry. There are answers one can suggest, but I don't want to distract from the source provided and his general approach. – user6591 Nov 13 '18 at 12:49
  • Alex’s answer deals with that issue. The Meshech Chochmah doesn’t fully answer my question either way. – DonielF Nov 13 '18 at 14:19

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .