There is a prohibition against a Jew eating human flesh. There is a dispute if it is a biblical or rabbinic prohibition (see here, here and here). Either way, I'm wondering if a non jew has the same prohibition. If it's biblical, can we assume since its not one of the seven Noahides Laws they're exempt? Or according to those who say it's one of the "mitzvos sichliot", a prohibition stemming from svara, would they indeed be forbidden? If it's rabbinic, can we assume the Rabbis didn't meddle with non jews' diets? Is this discussed anywhere.

  • "Or according to those who say it's "sichliot", a svara to prohibit, would they indeed be forbidden" - Please define this terminology. – DanF Aug 7 '17 at 17:25
  • @DanF it's mentioned in one of the links I put. I'll add a direct link. – robev Aug 7 '17 at 17:34
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    @DonielF your question prompted me to find the opinion. I linked to it; it's the Rosh. Regarding your second point, that's exactly why I asked this question. – robev Aug 7 '17 at 18:38
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    @DonielF Actually the Gemara in Chulin (92, b) brings [shameless] cannibalism as one of the three Mitzvos out of thirty they still keep - according to Rashi's first understanding. שאין כותבין כתובה לזכרים ואחת שאין שוקלין בשר המת במקולין ואחת שמכבדין את התורה – Ir Relevant Aug 7 '17 at 18:46
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    @IrRelevant Gosh, I've been looking for that Gemara for years, in a completely unrelated context. Baruch atah lashamayim shehechezarta aveidasi. – DonielF Aug 7 '17 at 18:52

OK, so I'm a lurker/guest and this is an old post but I came across this post and it's not been answered directly.

I'm just going to point out that cannibalism IS prohibited to all men under the Noachide laws. Of the seven laws, the third law states: Do not murder. And the sixth law states: Do not eat of a live animal.

So, where is this human meat coming from? Did you kill someone to get it? Because that is not permissible. Or, did you cut it off of a living person and then eat that? Because that is not permissible, either.

Now, you could possibly eat a human that died of natural causes if you really wanted to. However, the seventh law tells mankind to establish courts of justice and to ensure obedience.

In most developed countries, it's illegal to eat a corpse.

  • Welcome to MiYodeya Chaya. Since MY is different from other sites you might be used to, see here for a guide which might help understand the site. Please consider registering your account, to enable more site features, including voting. Hope to see you around! – mbloch Apr 26 at 20:37
  • Certainly not covered by Noahide laws. Example: Gentile is in a life/death situation and must choose between eating human corpse or a limb taken off a live animal (by someone else). – boruchsiper Apr 26 at 20:58
  • The scenario you are referring to is covered in the comments here: judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/77375/… OP asked if it were prohibited. Yes, it is prohibited. There is always room for prohibitions for Jews and Gentiles alike to be circumvented due to extreme circumstances. However, that was not the question – Chaya Apr 26 at 21:17
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  • The OP asked “is this discussed anywhere?” If this is your own logic, this wouldn’t seem to address that, as the OP is looking for sources. If this is indeed sourced somewhere, would you please provide a source? – DonielF Apr 26 at 21:25

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