7

What is the reason why some people do not recite Hallel on Yom Ha'atzmut but recite it on Yom Yerushalayim? I've been at minyanim who practice this. Being that reciting Hallel on these days follows a certain point of view regarding the state of Israel, why would some people recite it on one but not the other?

  • net-sah.org/faq/21025 Rav Tal does not say hallelujah on yon hastzmaut but on yon yerushalajim. I know it from someone who learned in his yeshiva – David Michael Gang May 25 '17 at 20:12
  • Possible duplicate of Should Hallel be recited on Yom Yerushalayim – DonielF May 25 '17 at 20:24
  • 3
    @DonielF Now why would this be a duplicate? He's clearly asking how Yom Y differs from Yom H. – Moses613 May 25 '17 at 20:45
  • I have been told it is the difference between a political declaration and an actual nes in action. I do not have the citations so it is not an answer. – sabbahillel May 25 '17 at 21:19
  • @sabbahillel See my answer, below. It's doesn't completely confirm what you said, but, most of it seems close. – DanF May 25 '17 at 21:41
1

While this is far from a "mainstream" concept, as far as I know, a number of yeshivot and Orthodox shuls in my mainly Orthodox neighborhood follow exactly this custom. (Do you live in NYC area, BTW?)

The reasoning is that they don't support the current Israeli secular government, and feel that the founding of what is now Israel was based on mainly secular concepts. (This reason partially explains why neither the shul nor yeshiva displays an Israeli flag or recites "Hatikvah" at social events.) However, all of them acknowledge the significance, holiness and importance of Yerushalayim, particularly, the Kotel. They all agree that the most significant accomplishment of the 6 Day War was regaining access to the Kotel, and that is something to say Hallel for.

I surmise that part of their thinking is making some sort of "political" statement, but it's not obvious to me what it would be and for what purpose.

  • I think most people think the most significant accomplishment if the six day war was regaining the temple mount, not just the retaining wall outside it – Double AA May 26 '17 at 12:06
  • @DoubleAA from a purely technical halachic perspective, the most significant accomplishment is probably winning the war and not being annihilated. – Yehuda Shapira May 29 '17 at 14:27
  • @YehudaShapira I don't think that aspect is a part of the yeshivot thinking regarding Y.Y. If winning the war were important, they would be marking a holiday and Hallel for the Independence war, 56, Yom Kippur war, etc. In many of the yeshivot mindset, Israel is important because it happens to contain Yerushalayim. I.e., Yerushalayim is the only important current spot in Israel. The rest of the country doesn't matter much to them. If the whole country was just Y"M, I think they'd be happy. – DanF May 29 '17 at 16:49
1

Originally the Chief Rabbinate of Israel ruled that one should say Hallel without a bracha on Yom Haatzmaut ("The Chief Rabbinate ruled to recite Hallel without a blessing." http://hirhurim.blogspot.co.il/2007/04/hallel-on-yom-ha-atzmaut.html?m=1; "Because of all, or some, of these concerns, the Chief Rabbinate’s Council originally prescribed that one recite the Hallel without a blessing during the morning prayers of Yom HaAtzmaut." ph.yhb.org.il/en/05-04-07) and with a bracha on Yom Yerushalayim ("The Chief Rabbinate, in a ruling signed by Chief Rabbis Isser Yehuda Unterman and Yitzchak Nissim, along with the renowned R. Shlomo Yosef Zevin and R. Shaul Yisraeli, ruled that Hallel on Yom Yerushalayim should be recited with a blessinng." http://etzion.org.il/en/celebrating-yom-ha-atzmaut-and-yom-yerushalayim) This is because Yom Yerushalayim is more clearly a miracle as a definite military victory occurred then, whereas Yom Haatzmaut was merely the day of a declaration. Perhaps some people extended this reasoning.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .