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Due to a chromosomal abnormality, and its effects on my body, I do not fit into a traditional binary gender class. I have therefore taken to calling myself transgendered, as it's much easier than explaining my condition to others. What does the Torah say in regards to this? I'm not genetically a "true male", nor am I anatomically a "true female", but somewhere in between.

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    Welcome to Mi Yodeya Haylee! – mevaqesh May 10 '17 at 2:54
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    Consider clarifying two points: a) what do you mean by 'Torah'? The Pentateuch, or any Jewish teachings? And more significantly b) what do you mean by 'gender roles'? There are numerous clear legal differences between men and woman, with major ramifications regarding who one can marry, for example. The issue of gender roles in general, however, is much more ill defined in general. Are you just asking about the legal definition of sex, with all its resultant ramifications, or specifically about the less defined "roles"? – mevaqesh May 10 '17 at 2:57
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    What the Torah says about chromosomal abnormalities depends on the specifics of the condition. For example, the Talmud discusses several different classes of atypical conditions that may involve chromosomal abnormalities, such as: seris, ayloness, andrognus, and tumtum. According to one medrash, the matriarch Sarah was an ayloness, which is a term that may include a woman who has XY chromosomes. An androginus is an individual with both male and female external genitalia, and is treated by Jewish law as an uncertainty, but is for the most part treated as male. – Loewian May 10 '17 at 3:38
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    See also, for example: daat.ac.il/daat/english/journal/cohen-1.htm – Loewian May 10 '17 at 3:40
  • And you might look at judaism.stackexchange.com/a/80442/1516 – SAH May 11 '17 at 0:57

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