1

I've heard that it's not good to name after someone who has suffered bad mazel, but are there any halachic prohibitions against it? It apparently means "persecuted" but Miriam means "bitter" so they don't all need to have pleasant meanings, right? I really appreciate the message of remaining faithful even when it isn't easy. Just wondering!

  • 2
    I'm not aware of any halachicly prohibited names. Is anyone else? – Double AA Mar 15 '17 at 3:24
  • @doubleAA sefaria.org/Yoma.38b.4/he/… – Shmuel Brin Mar 15 '17 at 3:32
  • 2
    @ShmuelBrin Is that a prohibition? The OP already knows "that it's not good to name after someone who has suffered bad mazel" – Double AA Mar 15 '17 at 3:34
  • Welcome to Mi Yodeya Nechama! Thanks for sharing the question. Consider reading this short Beginners' Guide to the site. It notes the importance of adding sources where possible. In this case, while the question is ok, it could be strengthened with some link or reference to the issue you mention of naming after a person with bad mazal. This helps users investigate whether or not it is an actual prohibition. – mevaqesh Mar 15 '17 at 3:47
  • 1
    @DoubleAA mis-read the question. I thought she wanted to know if one should avoid naming children after people who suffered (and weren't just evil - though Iyov was arguably evil). – Shmuel Brin Mar 15 '17 at 3:54
1

It's not entirely clear to me what you mean by 'halachic prohibition', but if you mean do halachic authorities rule that you shouldn't name after people who underwent certain negative experiences, the answer is yes. See here for example. The reason behind it is that it could potentially harm the child, which would seem to be a more important consideration than any positive message expressed by the name. That being said, however, whether Iyov technically falls into that category is a separate question. Additionally, even if he does qualify as 'רוע מזליה', there may be ways around it, such as adding an additional name. A Rabbi should be consulted.

|improve this answer|||||
  • "if you mean do halachic authorities rule that you shouldn't name after people who underwent certain negative experiences" Is that really so? Seems to me there are halachic authorities who say that you shouldn't name after people who underwent certain negative experiences. I don't see anyone ruling on a legal issue. – Double AA Mar 15 '17 at 4:40
  • The reason behind it is that it could potentially harm the child Note however that many superstitions are forbidden or at least discouraged by Judaism. Erring on the side of superstition may not be merely useless, but may be counterproductive. – mevaqesh Mar 15 '17 at 4:41
  • 1
    @Jay A book of responsa need not contain exactly 100% halachic rulings. You know that. Books of mathematics for example don't only contain theorems. They also contain best practices and tips. So too with the letters of rabbis. If you can find a legal issue in the letter that he ruled on, then mention it. Otherwise don't pretend there is one. – Double AA Mar 15 '17 at 4:47
  • 1
    To clarify @DoubleAA's first comment, the OP is aware of a superstition regarding naming after those who suffered misfortune. The OP wasn't looking for this, but rather for some specific halakhic prohibition. All this answer does is reference one source that in turn cites other sources that were concerned enough with the superstition, that the source recommended that one avoid it "מן הראוי להקפיד". However that source does not state that there is any halakhic prohibition, besides for the superstition, which is what the OP asked about – mevaqesh Mar 15 '17 at 5:42
  • 1
    Even if every query is a halachik one that doesn't mean that everything in the book is a halachik ruling. You keep missing that. Every chapter heading in a math book may be about a theorem too. – Double AA Mar 15 '17 at 15:22

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .