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Suppose I enter a kosher bakery and want to purchase some food item from the shelves. Can I pick that thing up by my hands for purchase?

My reason is that the laws of Kashrut are very very strict, and I do not want to pollute the kosher items kept in the shelves, but I want to purchase as those things are clean and Halal for muslims to eat or consume, but I also do not want to violate any laws of kosher.

  • A really interesting question would be whether a Muslim can touch non-mevushal wine. I'm guessing the practical answer is no, at least al pi gezeira--but what is the theoretical answer? – SAH Jan 22 '17 at 17:55
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    @EngineerIshratHussain This is pleasant talk and happiness from a handsome and beautiful person, I am sure. :) Salam. – David Kenner Jan 22 '17 at 19:39
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    Ishrat, the only issue I can think of would be yayin stam (wine touched/produced by non-Jews). AFAIK, most schools of Sharia forbid the consumption of alcoholic beverages in the first place, so I can't see why a Muslim would be picking up a bottle of wine (especially at a bakery). – Noach MiFrankfurt Jan 22 '17 at 19:53
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    Beyond generic standards for sanitation (not related to Jewish law) that some people might not like unwashed hands directly touching their food, there's no problem, unless you actually have residue from outside food on your hands. If the food is wrapped then even that wouldn't apply. That's why Jews have no problem buying kosher packaged groceries in a store even though other shoppers and the cashier can and do handle the packages. A kosher bakery may ask that you don't bring outside food in to the bakery, however. – A L Jan 22 '17 at 20:08
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    The reason of OP could also be because, Muslims do have a belief that open food should not be touched by polytheists( with wet hands) or else it has to be washed before consumption. For Muslims, Jews and Christians are ppl of the book so that does not apply to them but the same may not be true the other way around. So what a Muslim wont like for their food the same rule may apply to them as well and so should be careful not to contaminate who may think Muslims to be impure if there is such a concept in Kashrut. A new Q perhaps: do Jews think Muslims are impure to touch their food? – sarmahdi Jan 24 '17 at 0:34
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It is very considerate of a Muslim to care about helping Jewish people protect the laws of kashrut. I assume it is because the Muslim is motivated by fear of Heaven and care for a fellow human being.

There is no known problem in Kosher law which would restrict Muslims from contact with Kosher bakery goods. (to my knowledge)

Thanks for asking.

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    The reason of OP could also be because, Muslims do have a belief that open food should not be touched by polytheists( with wet hands) or else it has to be washed before consumption. For Muslims, Jews and Christians are ppl of the book so that does not apply to them but the same may not be true the other way around. So what a Muslim wont like for their food the same rule may apply to them as well and so should be careful not to contaminate who may think Muslims to be impure if there is such a concept in Kashrut. – sarmahdi Jan 23 '17 at 4:37
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    @Sarmahdi Your comment provides extremely helpful context for understanding the possible motivation for the question. Do you think it might be more useful as a comment on the question, rather than here as a comment on an answer? – mweiss Jan 23 '17 at 14:31
  • @mwiess I was building on "I assume it is because the Muslim is motivated by fear of Heaven and care for a fellow human being" meaning besides the fear of God and human care it is also motivated because we believe " Do unto others as you would have them do unto you" so i was answering David's assumption. but yes looking at Danno's comment it does fit over there as well – sarmahdi Jan 24 '17 at 0:33

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