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Would some kind person advise me on the Halachic status of the hindquarters of a sheep or cow for kosher consumption on the table. It is my understanding that a leg of a lamb, for example, may be rendered kosher if an additional procedure is carried out by a shochet or kosher butcher to effect the complete removal of all blood vessels from what would otherwise be a non-kosher cut of meat from these animals. I seem to recall, from many years ago, that this process was called 'porching' Am I correct? If so, what is the additional process called in Hebrew/Yiddish-English transliteration?

Is there any connection between removing the sciatic nerve of the animal during the post-slaughter butchering and the possibility of rendering hindquarter-cuts kosher for consumption? May I also have advice on the offal of these animals as to its status as kosher for the table. Many thanks.

  • Is there any connection between removing the sciatic nerve of the animal during the post-slaughter butchering and the possibility of rendering hindquarter cuts kosher for consumption? yes – kouty Nov 7 '16 at 7:25
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    In Yiddish the process is called treiber and involves removing the sciatic nerve and fats that are forbidden to eat because they are reserved for the altar. Since it involves extra labor and expense, the entire rear section of the animal is often sent to the non-kosher market. – sabbahillel Nov 7 '16 at 10:40
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    Possible duplicate of what is kosher meat? – sabbahillel Nov 7 '16 at 14:44
  • FYI - regarding @sabbahillel's comment fats that are forbidden to eat because they are reserved for the altar (in Hebrew, this fat is called chelev - ion English it is commonly called "suet".) This type of fat is commonly used to make soaps and candles. IIRC, Jews may make it for this purpose as well. – DanF Nov 7 '16 at 16:46

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