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Since I started keeping cholov yisroel at home, I've had to change my buying habits because the milk (and yogurt) spoils so fast. I've tried several brands from several stores, and it is always the same: the stuff spoils within ten days inevitably. Others I've talked to report the same experiences.

I'm not saying this is so bad; I'm just wondering why it is, since cholov yisroel dairy is already more expensive, and one would think that the extra measure of supervision would if anything make it fresher, as is probably the case with kosher meat.

So, what's the answer? Why does cholov yisroel dairy spoil so much faster than cholov stam?

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    No intrinsic reason. Look into the supply chain. – Avrohom Yitzchok Sep 18 '16 at 15:34
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    Check the sell by dates. It may be that it does not go off the shelves as fast as "regular" milk. – sabbahillel Sep 18 '16 at 17:28
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it does not ask about Judaism. Nor does it even as for information not related to Judaism that could facilitate the practice or understanding of Judaism. – mevaqesh Sep 19 '16 at 0:46
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    It is perhaps appropriate for cooking.stackexchange.com. – mevaqesh Sep 19 '16 at 0:52
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    @mevaqesh I think this is "general science relating to Judaism"? – Scimonster Sep 19 '16 at 4:34
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I've noticed the same problem quite consistently. Although, I must admit that some brands of Chalav stam milk have the same problem.

I'll relay what I have heard from 3 store owners in the NY area. All of them said that for some reason, many of the Chalav Yisra'el companies do not sufficiently refrigerate their milk. 2 of the 3 owners told me that sometimes the deliverers are leaving the milk crates out of the truck too long until it gets into the store's fridge (I guess there is some time in between when the store needs to do inventory or some other tasks. I didn't ask about those details.) In some cases, the milk crates are sitting on hot pavement during the summer! (I can't fathom why an "honest" store manager would want to sell such milk to his customers, but that's a different problem - possibly with halachic problems.)

Keep in mind that this info could be occurring moreso in the New York metro area, and perhaps in larger stores than others. The store managers owned fairly large supermarkets. I can only go by what they have told me. FWIW, I have personally seen a few stores where the milk is sitting on the hot pavement, (in the summer, pavement temps in NYC can reach 120 deg. F. You can determine how long the milk will stay fresh at that temp.) and I have seen it a few times. I'm appalled, myself, that such milk is eventually sold to the consumer.

  • I wonder if the same happens to the kosher meat? I certainly hope not... – SAH Sep 23 '16 at 18:48
  • @SAH I don't think so. Fresh kosher meat has much different handling. From my understanding, the stores get huge slabs that come directly from the truck and go into the butcher area / fridge almost immediately. OTOH, one area I question is ground meat. How often is that grinder cleaned, really? Years ago (I'm talking about 40 years ago), I often ate raw ground meat. It was delicious, and I didn't get sick. I think then with smaller butchers, they were more careful and you could better monitor things. Now, I don't think I would do this much. – DanF Sep 23 '16 at 19:15
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I've had the same question. The following is what I've been told by people who claim to be in the know. I can't verify whether the facts or the science is true.

The short answer is a lack of injection of certain growth hormones into the dairy cows.

The longer version. A large portion of the Chalav Yisroel milk (at least in the east cost U.S.A.) come from farms run under Hassidic auspices.

The Hassidic Rabbis as a general rule believe that an injection delivered into a cows stomach through the stomach walls renders the cow a treipha who's milk may not be drunk.

Most non-hassidic Rabbis disagree. Rabbi Belsky took exceptional offense to this idea. He said they were paskening with a hava amina (first thought) in the gemara instead of the maskana (final ruling).

As you may have guessed by now, the claim is that those hormones effect the milk and give it a longer shelf life.

[I'm not sure about the current law but supposedly it was illegal for a company to advertise that their milk was produced without growth hormones for fear of causing undo concerns amongst the consumers. Some chalav yisroel milk companies were allowed to advertise this fact being that it is a religious exemption.]

I personally have found a difference in different companies. I won't name the ones that seem to spoil faster, but I will say that I have been pleased with Fresh and Tasty.

  • I have no idea what Lubavitch's opion on the injection question is. Maybe someone here can fill us in. – user6591 Sep 18 '16 at 16:08
  • " illegal for a company to advertise that their milk was produced without growth hormones" not true. plenty of milk companies do this. One of the issues is distribution. Often milk will be shipped to one location and from there be shipped to other cities. as a result the milk when it gets to some places will have a shorter shelf life. Thankfully where I live there are a few chalav yisroel choices which eliminates this issue as one is produced locally. – Dude Sep 18 '16 at 16:25
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    @Dude I put that in as a parenthetical statement prefaced with a supposedly for a reason:) – user6591 Sep 18 '16 at 16:31
  • I'm not a bovine biologist but I'm skeptical of the science here. FWIW. Hormones would maybe make more milk per cow, but I don't know why the milk should be different. – Double AA Sep 18 '16 at 20:49
  • @Double I too don't know if this makes any sense. But this was told to me by someone who's father is one of the big hassidic rav hamachshirim. – user6591 Sep 18 '16 at 20:55

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