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How can a Jew change his/her name halachically? Would there be a difference between adding a name versus changing the name completely? I am asking about the proper procedure for changing a name that would actually change it for gitten, aliyahs etc. Please provide a source - not "my Rabbi said" or "I heard a chabad rabbi/ sefardi av beis din say"...

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    By 'how can' do you mean 'what is the procedure for'? – Yishai Sep 5 '16 at 19:22
  • I'm asking how - as in the procedure for changing the name. – Mark A. Sep 6 '16 at 0:07
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    @sabbahillel I do not think this is a duplicate, as this is specifically asking for instructions and that is asking for what problems to look out for. – WAF Sep 6 '16 at 0:59
  • I recewntly heard a tape that went through the procedure for changing ones name. It is similar to the procedure for adding a name, but not quite. The magid shiur on the tape said that there is a specific set of brachos that must be said during an aliyah to the torah for it to be valid. He said that it can be found in some sefardi siddurim. – sabbahillel Sep 6 '16 at 2:02
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I recently heard a tape that went through the procedure for changing ones name. It is similar to the procedure for adding a name, but not quite. The magid shiur on the tape said that there is a specific set of brachos that must be said during an aliyah to the torah for it to be valid. He said that it can be found in some sefardi siddurim.

The main method involves being called to the Torah with the new name and certain brachos recited establishing the new name as belonging to the new person that one has become. Rav Moshe Feinstein says that once the new name is used in front of a minyon, and the person called to the torah by that name, the name has changed. The person then uses the new name for all purposes and is treated like Avraham or Yaakov.

See The Halacha of Changing One’s Jewish Name Summary provided by Rabbi Levi Alter

In Shulchan Aruch Even Haezer 129 Bet Shmuel 33, Igrot Moshe by Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, Even HaEzer IV 104, states: “A name that a person is called by for thirty days becomes one’s Halachic name.” We change the name by the recitation of Tehillim in the presence of a Minyan with special Tefillos, including a Yehi Ratzon, for a name which symbolizes life (Chaim, Chaya), health (Raphael, Raphaella), strength (Gabriel, Gabrielle), or hope (Tikva).

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