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If I'm boarding at a non religious persons house (they don't keep kosher), what are the rules for cleaning for pesach? I share the pantry and fridge so I don't know what to clean and how well to clean it.

closed as off-topic by DanF, sabbahillel, Shokhet, Scimonster, Daniel Apr 13 '16 at 23:20

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There are two basic operating principles: make sure your food is not contaminated by chametz, and make sure you don't own any chametz.

As far as what you eat, you'd need to clean your spaces well enough that chametz doesn't wind up in your food. If there are crumbs in the fridge/pantry that could get into your Passover food, clean them -- or keep your Passover food in sealed bags. (If you need to kasher a kitchen or the like, that's a different discussion.)

As for ownership, either you get rid of all the chametz you own; or seal it off someplace and sell it to a non-Jew. (E.g. put all your chametz in a taped box in the back of the fridge.)

That's the basic theory.

(Yes if you want to complicate things, there's the Vilna Gaon's opinion that you shouldn't even have another Jew's chametz in your house ... assuming a boarding situation is considered "your house" ... but that's a separate discussion.)

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