I am a Muslim from Peshawar, Pakistan. If I convert to Judaism, I will be in opposition with my Muslim family, particularly my brothers and sisters.

If I convert, who will help and support me in my future life? What money or other advantages will I get if I convert to Judaism?

closed as too broad by sabbahillel, DanF, Daniel, Matt, Danny Schoemann Dec 29 '15 at 8:40

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    How can you speak of advantage if you will lose your family in the process? You ask, "Who will support me and support me in my future life?" Who supports you now Asif? When you know the answer to that question, you will know the answer to your own question. May you be blessed by the Creator of us all to be led on the path of your life and to reach its successful and appropriate conclusion. – Yaacov Deane Dec 29 '15 at 3:03
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    Asif, welcome to the site. The question that you ask is very broad and would be primarily opinion-based. I know little about Islam, and being a life-long practicing Jew, I would have a large bias telling you my "advantages" to Judaism without understanding your "advantages" to Islam to make a fair comparison for your benefit. One aspect that you mention in your question is that you would be in opposition to your family. Judaism places high value on family structure as I'm sure Islam does. So, I'd recommend carefully considering just this one aspect before you proceed further. – DanF Dec 29 '15 at 3:06
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    I don't know that there is a Jewish community in Peshawar. It may not be safe or even possible to convert while there. – Fred Dec 29 '15 at 3:14
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    If your motivation to become jewish is so you can have financial support and other 'advantages' you are not going to be converted. You need a sugar daddy not Judaism. – Yossi Dec 29 '15 at 14:59
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    One aspect you should consider carefully is that it is a well-known fact that as a nation, Jews suffer more physical and spiritual oppression than any other culture or nation on Earth. It is also a fact that the most violent oppression towards Jews is caused by Muslims. (View their obsession with destroying not just Israel, but Jews worldwide.) So, if you became Jewish, you would probably have to worry that your own family may try to kill you - directly or indirectly. Perhaps, your family may be tolerant, but your faith, largely, is not. Are you strong-enough to face this pressure? – DanF Dec 29 '15 at 16:35

There are no benefits to converting beyond the fact that you are serving as an example and teacher to the rest of the nations, and that your fate is tied to that of the Jewish people, who if are collectively righteous, are promised the opportunity for maximum spiritual growth. However, an extremely high degree of spiritual growth is available to gentiles who accept a Jewish conception of G-d and the universe without actually committing to Jewish law. As a Muslim, you're 99% of the way there. Allah is metaphysically identical to the Jewish G-d (excepting the Ash'ariyya and Sufis) with the only difference being that the Jewish G-d gave the law and stewardship of the law to the Jews, and that he did not send prophets after Malachi.

The Noahide Law (the minimum expected of Gentiles according to the law and tradition maintained by the Jews since the time of Noah) provides one with the capacity and right to fully serve G-d and earn eternal life just the same as any Jew. A righteous gentile spiritually outranks even a high priest if the gentile is wiser than the priest.

There are no material gains whatsoever, and in fact, there are several downsides. You are expected to be held to a higher standard than gentiles, and many things that are permitted to you as a gentile become forbidden as a Jew. Jews are expected to observe 613 commandments, gentiles only 7, 6 of which are "negative" commandments which don't involve actually doing anything; just not doing something which you as a decent human being weren't going to do anyway. If you're interested in learning about your obligations as a gentile, see Hilkhoth Melakhim uMilkhamoth Chapters 9 and 10. That's this linked page and the next. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.

  • What do the Ash'ariyya and Sufis claim? – John Feb 15 '17 at 13:43
  • @ShamanSTK where is there a discussion, if any, that there are laws or customs that pertain only to native born Jews and not to gerim? – ninamag Sep 11 '17 at 6:25

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