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In slichos this morning I noticed a mention of the 8th and 9th of Teves also being fasts. Were these three days ever fasts all at once or were these fasts independently observed and replaced each time by the most recent tragedy until the 10th became the most recent fast for this time?

  • background on the 9th of Tevet frumheretic.blogspot.com/2009/01/fast-of-9th-of-tevet.html – rosends Dec 22 '15 at 17:31
  • and background on the 8th and the relationship of the 3 templeinstitute.org/three-days-septuagint.htm – rosends Dec 22 '15 at 17:34
  • The reason for the fast is that (saint) Peter died that day. He was considered a great Jewish man, because before him the Jewish people had been following JC because he said keep the torah and follow me. Peter decided that christians should stop keeping the Torah and therefore the Jewish people stopped being christians. This is mentioned in hagahos of Boruch Taam on the siman. Also in Rashi in the new mesivta gemoro AZ/. – patient Dec 26 '17 at 19:55
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The Behag lists a number of days where the custom is to fast because of various historical tragedies, including both 8 and 9 Tevet. While the Tur and Shulchan Arukh quote this list in OC 580, the Beit Yosef (16th century) and the Arukh haShulchan (19th century) there note that they've never heard of anyone fasting on the days on that list (and frankly, never have I).

I note many question the list's authority as some of the days it recommends fasting on are Rosh Chodesh (when fasting is generally forbidden).

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I can't locate my source, but I remember learning that these three days were all fasts for especially pious people (they would fast three days in a row and eat at night.) Since we won't demand that of most people, we fast on the last day of the three to commemorate all three tragedies. So special people did, and perhaps still do, fast on all three days, but that has never been the norm for all Jews.

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