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During the galut (after the second temple, ie our times), what is the Jewish religious authority according to halakha? A Great Assembly of Rabbanim? Something else?

closed as unclear what you're asking by sabbahillel, Danny Schoemann, Scimonster, Gershon Gold, Isaac Moses Nov 17 '15 at 14:58

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    Which galut are your referring to? The inter-Temple period, after the Second Temple, more recent times? And what do you mean by "Jewish religious authority"? – Ypnypn Nov 16 '15 at 23:10
  • Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/8626 – msh210 Nov 17 '15 at 1:00
  • (no sources, hence comment) There is none. We rely on the Talmud's ruling in lieu of an authoritative contemporary Sanhedrin, and on local rabbis for the practical application of the Talmud's rulings. The reason given for this that I've heard is that people basically decided that they were on lower level and couldn't argue with the Sages. My personal view is that without the Talmud's rulings to hold us together, we would splinter and be lost. Even with it we have begun to split, but it has held us together thus far. the Messiah needs a people to come back to, after all. – Baby Seal Nov 17 '15 at 2:42
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clarifying which "galut" you are refering to would help your question. My answer is going to based upon the assumption you are referring to the exile following the second beis hamikdash until today with a story about the vilna goan...

the gra was known for his stance that he did not pasken halachos for individuals. in thebuilding where the gra lived there was a another Jewish family. The woman of the house was preparing for shabbos and accidentally used a dairy spoon to mix her chicken soup. She became very nervous and had her husband leave as soojn as he stepped in the door to go ask the local rav if they could still eat the soup. Her husband had bee taking some time and the woman was getting anxious. She walked ustairs to see of the gra would be able to help her. After explaining her situation to his wife the gra agreed to see her andd told her the sou was not kosher. Upon hearing this she was releived and went downstairs to get rid of the soup. upon getting to her apartment her husband came home. Her husbnadreported the soup was ok but to kasher the spoon. Now the woman was worried she already got an answer that said it was not okay. The woman again become worried and hurried ustairs to ask the gra what to do. He said if the rav said it's ok then it is kosher and to prove that I accept his decision I'm going to come down and have a bowl of sou with your family. Upon the gra getting to her living quarters she became nervous with the vilna goan in her house and droped the soup. Before she had anything to say the gra preempted her by saying you have nothing to worry about. Don't think that you dropping the soup was in any fashion some sort of divine will because I had rled before it wasn't kosher rather you were nervious and that what your local rav said is halacha today just as much as what a king would have degreed. Today we don't have amelech but the decisions of a rav within that community carry the weight of legal authority within the Jewish community.

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