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There are two new or modified fruits called pineberries and strasberry . What bracha are they?

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If #user11355 is referring to a cross of pineapple and strawberry then there would be no problem since both are "pri ha'adamah". Whether the cross is permitted (or even possible) is another matter, but post facto, ha'adamah.

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    The referenced article says, "The soft-textured strasberry (at bottom in photo), which some people mistakenly assume is a hybrid of strawberry and raspberry, is genetically all strawberry ... " and the Wikipedia entry for pineberry suggests that it is all strawberry. – Avrohom Yitzchok Oct 29 '15 at 10:24
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As stated above, these are really just interesting varieties of strawberries.

And at the end of the day, the bracha is "ha'eitz" if it reproduces like a true perennial (and according to some, doesn't grow too close to the ground); "ha'adama" otherwise. There's no need to look at the plant's parentage, just its own particular characteristics.

  • There's no need to look at the plant's parentage, just its own particular characteristics. where does it say that? – user11335 Oct 29 '15 at 11:18
  • Indeed, editing into the answer a source for its claims would improve its value greatly. – msh210 Oct 29 '15 at 21:21
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Strawberries (including, presumably, these cultivars) are perennials. The leaves/stems die every winter, but the roots remain from year to year. Because they have no woody structure that survives above ground over the winter (as do e.g. blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries), they require a "...borei pri ho'adama" ("...Creator of the fruit of the ground") like annual vegetables. (The other berries I mention which do have a surviving woody structure should technically merit a "borei pri ha'etz" - "Creator of the fruit of the tree/wood". There are however some traditions to say "borei pri ho'adama" if they grow close to the ground.)

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    Editing into the answer a source for its claims would improve its value greatly. – msh210 Oct 29 '15 at 21:21

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