0

What is the reason for the kri ksiv in שמואל א' פרק ט' פסוק כ''ו, in which the ksiv is הגג but the kri הַגָּגָה?

I would like to know the reason for how the kri fits in to the pasuk and how the ksiv fits in to the pasuk.

closed as unclear what you're asking by DanF, Scimonster, Daniel, Danny Schoemann, Gershon Gold Jun 9 '15 at 12:19

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    Unclear of your focus. Do you want to know what the Kri corrects (often k'tiv results from "incorrect" transmissions, and the kri corrects the meaning) or do you wish to know what the k'tiv is trying to convey by being "ungrammatical", here? – DanF Jun 8 '15 at 20:26
  • @DanF I would like to know the reason for how the kri fits in to the pasuk and how the ksiv fits in to the pasuk. – Joshua Pearl Jun 9 '15 at 17:27
  • @DanF There, I have edited my question and mzade it more clear. – Joshua Pearl Jun 11 '15 at 6:16
  • In that case, my answer addresses the kri part. As for the ktiv, I have to research it, if there is an answer at all. As stated in my answer, ktiv's often result from errors, which is why the kri is there. – DanF Jun 11 '15 at 15:06
0

In Biblical Hebrew, when using a preposition such as "to" or "on" followed by the name of a place, Modern Hebrew would have used the word בגג . In Biblical Hebrew, the letter ה is added to the end of the place, instead. So, the meaning , here, is "He called to Samuel on the roof".

Compare this, for example, with Breishit 28:2, and see Rashi's grammar explanation, there.

I'm not sure what the reason for the k'tiv is, but the kri offers the correct meaning, here.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .