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This question already has an answer here:

I don't use an app as a sidur ever so maybe there is something thing obviously wrong with my question, but how can an app be used if it has Hashem's name?? - aren't you erasing His name when you scroll up or down, or is it that the letters aren't actually there they are just pixels displaying it....I don't know how it works electronically or Halachicly. Can someone please clue me in here

This may seem like a duplicate but there were no answers concerning this exact question there

marked as duplicate by Scimonster, rosends, Yishai, Gershon Gold halacha Jun 7 '15 at 3:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Please don't downvote me due to electronic ignorance – JediPythonClone Jun 5 '15 at 0:15
  • @Scimonster it is a bit different because my question is about just using it not even thinking about deleting it – JediPythonClone Jun 5 '15 at 10:33
  • Still, the main point of the question is about "erasing" Hashem's name from the screen. The top answer says that it isn't writing, and so there's no problem. – Scimonster Jun 5 '15 at 11:03
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The broader question is how can we allow the name of hashem to appear on a computer screen at all when we know the screen will eventually be turned off or the text moved. Whether you daven from the screen or not the issue is the same.

There are a number of sources that deal with this, and the bottom line they all come to in the end is that a computer screen is not "writing". There is no ink, no hand forming the letters, and no intention of permanentness. Old CRT monitors refreshed 60 times a second, so nothing on the screen had any permanence at all. Modern LCDs still have nothing physical - to quote Rav Ovadiah it's just "a combination of various lights".

Sources:

As a side note, I'd like to point out that it's possible that e-ink (used in amazon kindle) is of a different status because it does contain ink, and is permanent when drawn. I haven't seen a rabbi (or anyone for that matter) address the issue of e-ink yet, so my answer does not apply to that technology. I'm not saying it's asur. I'm not saying it's mutar. I'm saying I don't know.

  • I'm somewhat technologically behind. I never heard of e-ink. Would you have any link regarding what it is and its technology? I think this would be useful to ask my Rav regarding its usage for davening and similar. – DanF Jun 5 '15 at 2:20
  • Regarding e-ink, see judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/7275/…. @DanF – Scimonster Jun 5 '15 at 4:35
  • @DanF how stuff works has a good page on E-ink. electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/… The basic difference is that E-Ink is more permanent. An electric charge (as opposed to a pencil) moves a black dye around so that it is visible, and then the charge stops. At that point if no new electric charge is applied, the image on the screen will stay forever. (The kindle in fact displays images when it's turned off and it doesn't use power.) Only when the screen is refreshed (say the user hits "next page"), does a new electric charge change the image on the screen. – PopularIsn'tRight Jun 8 '15 at 17:04

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