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Regarding whether something needs to be considered chametz or not, there is a general rule of ראוי לאכילת כלב - i.e. - if a dog wouldn't eat it, then it's not considered food and therefore it is not chametz.

How old is this standard? I'm assuming that dog's diets have changed in many ways over time. Moreso, different breeds of dogs eat different foods. I assume that therefore this halachic definition has changed, as well. So, if we have something doubtful, how do we know what the standard is now for this halacha? Do we just find someone's pet dog and give to the dog to see if it will be eaten? (My neighbor's dog only eats hot dogs (go figure!) Obviously, that doesn't mean that rye bread is not chametz because the dog won't eat it.)

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    "I'm assuming that dog's diets have changed in many ways over time." Why assume that? "different breeds of dogs eat different foods." There were different breeds back in the days of the gemara too. – Double AA Mar 10 '15 at 14:54
  • I think the meaning of the words are "You would not feed it to the dog" – Gershon Gold Mar 10 '15 at 15:16
  • @GershonGold I don't. That would be להאכלת כלב – Double AA Mar 10 '15 at 15:19
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As far as the "put it in front of a dog" test, I heard from a student of R' Y.B. Soloveitchik that he once said in a shiur that toothpaste is not chometz because it is not fit for dog-consumption, upon which an attendant of the shiur piped up that his dog eats toothpaste. R' Soloveitchik responded that just because he has a dumb dog doesn't mean I have to sell toothpaste.

From this account I gather that the measure is what is considered "normal" for the average dog to eat. What one particular dog does (or doesn't do), doesn't matter.

As an aside, Rabbi Blumenkrantz (author of the famous Laws of Pesach guides) understood, based on some Rishonim, that the measure is specifically נפסל מאכילת כלב, has become unfit for dog consumption. This understanding excludes things that are made from the start in such a way that they are not fit for dog-consumption. It is a measure of how spoiled something is - if it isn't spoiled, but this is how it is supposed to be, then this shiur doesn't help you.

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    +1 I was going to mention the ein meviin raya mikelev shota story, but I've heard it the name of too many rabanim, I couldn't decide which one to credit it to:) – user6591 Mar 10 '15 at 18:35

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