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I'm wondering if it is forbidden to go onto a moving train on shabbos.

I'm having a hard time understanding the answer I heard before: the extra weight causes the train to use more power.

I thought about that answer for a while, and I realized that it would be such a small amount of work being done it must be nullified.

So, is it forbidden to go onto a moving train on Shabbos? If so, why?

EDIT: the case I have in mind here is not related to that if a subway. With the case of a subway, there's the issue of paying etc.. I'm simply wondering about why the added weight you cause by jumping onto a slow moving (freight) train (let's say, to not confuse this with a subway case) is forbidden on shabbat.

marked as duplicate by Shmuel Brin, Shokhet, msh210 Mar 2 '15 at 7:19

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  • Jumping onto a moving train causes the train to use more power. So does jumping onto a moving wheelbarrow. Probably the train is going faster than the wheelbarrow, so the additional power required is greater in the case of the train. Therefore if your argument is right for trains, it is even more right for wheelbarrows. – WillO Mar 2 '15 at 4:09
  • What about jumping onto a platform floating in a vat of water on a moving train?When you land on the platform, you will displace your weight in water and the train will not have to work harder because any extra weight has been splashed away? – Clint Eastwood Mar 2 '15 at 4:21
  • I'm voting to reopen this because i think it's worth exploring this issue outside of the context of the subway, as the answers to the other question (rightly) deal with payment and the like. – Scimonster Mar 2 '15 at 8:59
  • I think this is a different point. Really it is about the mechanics of getting on an escalator or moving floor that is free rather than a system for which you normally have to pay. Jumping on a moving train is obviously dangerous anyway. Whereas it is normal to step onto an escalator or moving walkway. (By the way I think there are some free moving walkways in Paris) – CashCow Mar 2 '15 at 12:07
  • @Cnsersmoit Scimonster, I don't see how that's not covered in the preexisting question. If the answers there don't address it, judaism.stackexchange.com/help/no-one-answers. – msh210 Mar 3 '15 at 5:33

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