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Could someone recommend a source for a machine-readable Hebrew with English Torah codex that may be used in software development projects?

By "machine readable," I mean of a format that may be accessed programmatically and searched according to a criteria specified by the reader. Possible digital formats might include an ASCII text file, XML file or a commonly used database format.

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    Hello and welcome to Mi Yodeya! Could you edit your question to add a little more in the way of requirements? What makes a source useful for software development? Are there formatting requirements, for example? Licensing ones? – Monica Cellio Jan 20 '15 at 13:32
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    I'm not sure if this is what you're looking for (I'm still not sure I understand the definition of "machine readable"), but you should take a look at the answers to this question. – Shokhet Jan 20 '15 at 13:49
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    Shokhet, Thank you most kindly for your response. By machine readable, I mean of a format that may be accessed programmatically and searched according to a criteria specified by the reader. Possible digital formats might include an ASCII text file, XML file or a commonly used database format. – Doug Kimzey Jan 20 '15 at 14:03
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    Further tip: Clarifications should be edited into the question itself, rather than buried in comments where no one will see them. You can then comment (using @-notifications as suggested) to let the person who called for the clarification know that their suggestion has been acted on. (Incidentally, ASCII Hebrew is unlikely, though I suppose it could be possible if you're willing to accept transliterated Hebrew.) – TRiG Jan 20 '15 at 14:52
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    I don't know why that page calls itself "ASCII table for Hebrew". It's Code page 862. That is one of the many many encodings which are ASCII plus something else. These are sometimes called "extended ASCII", but that is not really a proper name for them. The only proper name is "Windows Code page 862". – TRiG Jan 20 '15 at 15:30
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Sefaria is a great resource for this sort of thing.

See their developer documentation, and terms of use for more information.

They return results in JSON or JSONP. Each translation has its own copyright issues which you'll have to deal with distinctly.

However, "codex" might be too strict of a term when talking about translations.

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mechon-mamre.org

If you want Hebrew and English, they have http://mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0.htm (using the JPS translation).

I don't know the details on the permissions issues.

Otherwise, try wikitext.

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    "You may use materials from this site only for your private study and teaching, not for publishing in any form, including any Web site. Under our liberal understanding of the Fair Use Doctrine, you may use a few short quotations from our site in any other work, including copyrighted publications. Any other use requires written permission from us." From mechon-mamre.org – Scimonster Jan 20 '15 at 19:21
  • @Scimonster. Ah, thank you. The questioner wants something closer to public domain, I take it? – Shalom Jan 20 '15 at 20:05

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