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In bentching, there's one הרחמן that changes depending on who is saying it and where. There are essential 4 versions: home, parents' home, guest, and public place.

What does a hotel room (or vacation apartment) count as?

Is it your own home, due to paying to stay there? Does it count as being a guest, because you don't really live there? Or perhaps (unlikely) is it a public place, because lots of people stay there?

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    What's your source for saying "There are essential 4 versions: home, parents' home, guest, and public place"? Versions vary by book, but most I've seen have home, parents' home, and guest only. I don't recall ever seeing one that specified a version for a public place. (Note incidentally that Chabad books have only one version, the one you and I know as the parents'-home one.) In any event, I weakly suspect you can do what you want, adding in whatever is appropriate for the situation, but I've no source for saying so. – msh210 Dec 28 '14 at 4:21
  • @msh210 A lot of people say "כל המסובין כאן" when they're in a public space; that might be what Scimonster is referring to. I don't have a source for this. – MTL Dec 28 '14 at 4:23
  • I remember learning that this section is flexible and should be adapted according to circumstances. If you wish to include the owner of the hotel, you may, but since you aren't really a guest but are part of a business transaction, it's not essential since the owner in fact is making a profit out of you, and not allowing you to eat from his table. – Epicentre Dec 28 '14 at 5:31
  • @msh210 Like Shokhet said, there's also כל המסובים כאן, which is not printed in every bentcher, but is commonly said, and i've also seen it in becntchers from like, restaurants. – Scimonster Dec 28 '14 at 6:23
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Kitzur Shuchan Aruch סימן סח - דין תפלת הדרך ושאר דברים שצריכין לזהר בדרך

סעיף י': קְצָת נוֹהֲגִין שֶׁבִּהְיוֹתָם בַּדֶּרֶךְ וְאוֹכְלִים בְּבֵית עוֹבֵד כּוֹכָבִים, אֵין מְבָרְכִין בְּזִמּוּן, מִשּׁוּם דְּלֹא הֲוֵי קְבִיעוּת. וּמִכָּל מָקוֹם אִם קָבְעוּ עַצְמָן שָׁם לֶאֱכוֹל בְּיַחַד, אֵינוֹ נָכוֹן לְבַטֵּל הַזִּמּוּן. וְיֹאמְרוּ, הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יִשְׁלַח לָנוּ בְּרָכָה מְרֻבָּה בִּמְקוֹם הֲלִיכָתֵנוּ וּבִמְקוֹם יְשִׁיבָתֵנוּ עַד עוֹלָם. וְאִם אוֹכְלִים מִשֶּׁל אֶחָד, יְכוֹלִין לוֹמַר, הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יְבָרֵךְ אֶת בַּעַל הַבַּיִת הַזֶּה, וְקָאִי עַל בַּעַל הַסְּעוּדָּה, וְאִם לָאו, יֹאמְרוּ, הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יְבָרֵךְ אוֹתָנוּ. וְעַיֵּן לְעֵיל סוֹף סִימָן מ"ד (קצ"ג). ‏

(Not directly related to your question, but interesting: When eating in a non-Jews home (or in the open, where's there's no "house") one says הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יִשְׁלַח לָנוּ בְּרָכָה מְרֻבָּה בִּמְקוֹם הֲלִיכָתֵנוּ וּבִמְקוֹם יְשִׁיבָתֵנוּ עַד עוֹלָם instead of הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יִשְׁלַח לָנוּ בְּרָכָה מְרֻבָּה בַּבַּיִת הַזֶּה וְעַל שֻׁלְחָן זֶה שֶׁאָכַלְנוּ עָלָיו.)

As to your question:

If one is away from home, and one person is providing the food, one can say הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יְבָרֵךְ אֶת בַּעַל הַבַּיִת הַזֶּה and the בַּעַל הַבַּיִת refers to the person proving the food.

Otherwise, one simply says הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יְבָרֵךְ אוֹתָנוּ וְאֶת כָּל אֲשֶׁר לָנוּ.

As to סוֹף סִימָן מ"ד there it says אִם יֵשׁ עוֹבֵד כּוֹכָבִים בַּבַּיִת כְּשֶׁמְבָרֵךְ בִּרְכַּת הַמָּזוֹן, יֹאמַר אוֹתָנוּ בְּנֵי בְּרִית כֻּלָּנוּ יַחַד.

So if the location belongs to a non-Jew then the הָרַחֲמָן would be: הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יְבָרֵךְ אוֹתָנוּ בְּנֵי בְּרִית כֻּלָּנוּ יַחַד.

  • Must have missed this. I recommend you flip around the answer, to put the interesting fact at the end, focusing more on the actual answer (at the beginning). – Scimonster Jan 19 '15 at 15:53

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