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A friend of mine is getting married on one of the nights of Chanuka this year. I do know that he has been in contact with his rabbi about this, but since I'm not sure what he said, I'll post this question here to increase my own knowledge. ( If ever I find out what answer he got, I'll try to remember to post it here )

How is he supposed to light Chanuka candles the night he gets married? ...he's eating at the wedding hall, but there's no possibility of calling that his home. And when he gets to his hotel room after, it may be far too late to light and get the full mitzvah. Also, it's kind of a stretch to say that his hotel room counts as his house, as he's sleeping there one night, and moving to his apartment the next day. There's also the possibility that we judge him as someone who is homeless, but I don't think that that's a real option.

What should he do?

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    Shouldn't this be the same as anyone who's traveling? – Isaac Moses Dec 17 '14 at 19:49
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    Why is the hotel not his home? Thats where hes living that night. Hes even paying for it! – Double AA Dec 17 '14 at 20:07
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    Send some friends as messengers to the hotel room at 5pm – Double AA Dec 17 '14 at 20:08
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This, according to Halachipedia:

A wedding on Chanukah

  1. If the wedding takes place at night then the groom fulfills his obligation with the lighting in his father's house which took place before the wedding. [35]
  2. If the wedding takes place during the day before sunset, the groom [...] doesn't fulfill his obligation with the lighting in his father's house but rather he must light at his new house. Some say he should light after the wedding, some say he should appoint a messenger to light there, and some say he should leave the wedding between the Chuppah and meal to light at his new house. A minority opinion is that one may light at the wedding hall.[36]

Note 36, there:

(1) Rav Elyashiv (cited by Bet Chatanim 15:4, Yemeh Chanukah pg 156, Neimat HaChaim pg 244) rules that the groom should light in his new home after the wedding.

(2) Chacham Ben Tzion Abba Shaul (cited by Bet Chatanim 15:4, Yemeh Chanukah pg 156) rules that if it’s difficult to leave the wedding the groom should appoint a messenger to light for him.

(3) Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (cited by HaNesuin KeHilchatam 15:60, Yemeh Chanukah pg 156, Halichot Shlomo (pg 275, note 47)) rules that if the wedding takes place during the day then the groom must light at his new home and should leave the wedding after the chuppah before the meal, go to their new home, have a small meal, light chanuka candles, and return to the wedding.

(4) Piskei Teshuvot 677:5 (pg 499) rules that if it’s difficult to leave the wedding the groom may light at the wedding hall because they’re renting the place. (Rabbi Mansour applies this Piskei Teshuvot even if the wedding takes place during the night but the parents didn’t have a chance to light beforehand. Additionally, Rabbi Mansour seems to say that Yalkut Yosef also agrees with this leniency but was unable to find >any proof to this from the words of the Yalkut Yosef.)

FYI - My sister-in-law and niece (her daughter) both lit candles at the wedding. In my niece's case, they also lit candles after the couple arrived home late at night.

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    Who really thinks any of the groom's family were home lighting candles at the time... – Double AA Dec 17 '14 at 20:53

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