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I would like to educate myself about the nature and scope of the Biblical prohibition of "bribery" ("Shochad") and any associated Rabbinic prohibitions, as well as any derived ethical principles. I am interested in the basic application to judges as well as any applications (if they exist) that extend beyond the one to judges.

Are there any books that provide a comprehensive treatment of this prohibition and associated ethical principles?

Alternatively, what collection of sources should one study to get an overview of all the types of situations in which this prohibition and any derived ethical principles apply?

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    Choshen Mishpat 9 seems relevant – Double AA Dec 4 '14 at 21:04
  • @DoubleAA that's a good start. I'm also interested in applications to non-Judges (if they exist). – Isaac Moses Dec 4 '14 at 21:05
  • The preceding siman which also discusses judges throws in behavioral guidelines for any parness hatzibur, and the Bach there that the achronim on the page quote about a judge who buys his position actually makes a limud from the cohen gadol. But the lav of shochad shochad, and the esei of mah ani bichinam seem to only apply to judges, as brought in shulchan aruch. The famous Rambam in pirkei avos notwithstanding. – user6591 Dec 4 '14 at 21:12
  • Wait. That's not true. The ramma extends the judges laws to witnesses too. But that's it. – user6591 Dec 4 '14 at 21:15
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    Re judges, see R. Zalman Nechemia's book משפט ערוך (which is on hebrewbooks.org). Re ethical principles, do you mean things that are found in mussar seforim (like the first section of Michtav Me'eliyahu on free will)? – הנער הזה Dec 5 '14 at 2:49
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This article brings sources from

Torah, Mechilta, Sifri, Bavli, Yerushalmi, a selection of midrashim, Targum Yonason, Mishne Torah, Rabbeinu Yonah, Droshos HoRan, Menoras Hameor, Maharal, Kli Yokor, Malbim, Sefas Emes, Chochmoh Umussar and Reb Yerucham.

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