0

This question already has an answer here:

As I understand it, both Adam and Avraham had direct communication with God. Did Adam's communication with God make him Jewish? If not, what is the difference between the belief system of the descendants of Adam and those of Avraham?

marked as duplicate by msh210 Feb 3 '16 at 3:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Welcome to Mi Yodeya. Being Jewish isn't just about beliefs; somebody could believe exactly the same things about God and Torah as Jews do and not be Jewish. Do you mean to ask specifically about the differences in their beliefs, or how beliefs relate to Jewishness, or whether direct communication with God is limited to Jews? – Monica Cellio Oct 12 '14 at 1:28
  • very related judaism.stackexchange.com/q/8646/759 – Double AA Oct 12 '14 at 1:31
  • @MonicaCellio I am asking about the difference in their beliefs and if there were any Jews before Avraham. – James Jenkins Oct 12 '14 at 8:27
  • @DoubleAA yes, I read that question also during my research here, it implies that Avraham is the first Jew, but at the same time this answer by Scimonster implies that Chanoch (Enoch) and Noach also meet some of the key points (depending on several variables that are unclear) If being Jewish is simply being one of the chosen, who was born on or after the time of Avraham, than Adam could not have been Jewish, though as Monica says they may have the same beliefs. – James Jenkins Oct 12 '14 at 9:22
1

Plan A was that there was not supposed to be a need for a Jewish people at all.

Adam was supposed to pass the test of jealousy, lust, and honor and that would have been it.

He failed at all three. then humanity as a whole was given three chances to rectify these three.

they failed at all three.

Plan B, now it's no longer all of humanity that rectifies the sin of adam but a small group within humanity - the descendants of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacod, each of which represents the rectification of one of the three flaws.

source lecture by Rabbi Uziel Milevsky

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .