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A reason why having two sinks, in a kitchen, is justified, is because hot meat and milk cleaned or mixed together in a single sink could constitute bishul; one of the three prohibitions of "לֹא-תְבַשֵּׁל גְּדִי, בַּחֲלֵב אִמּוֹ" (Shemot 23:19, 34:26, Deut. 14:21)

The hot water that arrives at one's sink comes from a boiler, which flows through pipes before it reaches your sink. Are there any opinions that suggest that pipes containing water constitute a kli sheini? The ramification being, that there could be no prohibition of cleaning/mixing hot meaty and milky items in a sink together (for those that hold that there is no bishul in a kli sheini, even when it is above yad soledet boh).

  • You never pour hot water from a pot through a strainer? – Yishai Sep 8 '14 at 22:18
  • bondonk, are you concerned that meat and milk residue will both simultaneously be submerged in water poured from a Kli Rishon? – Double AA Sep 8 '14 at 22:31
  • @DoubleAA this could be considered a problem by many. However, I was wondering whether the issue of washing meat/milk items in a single sink is bypassed by pipes from a boiler possibly having kli sheini status. – bondonk Sep 9 '14 at 8:34
  • @bondonk You asked about the prohibition on bishul though. – Double AA Sep 9 '14 at 16:13
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See this other Mi Yodea Question which cites a source that municipal tap water could be used to fill up a mikvah.

The reason for this is, pipes are not considered to be keilim.

Normative practice has become to build mikvaot with many stringencies, but the basic fact that a pipe does not have a "beit kibel" (receptacle) and therefore, is not a kli, is generally accepted.

Therefore, the pipe from the hot water heater to the sink isn't a kli, and the water that comes into a kitchen sink is water from a kli rishon.

  • When the sink is closed, isn't it a Beit Kibbul? – Double AA Sep 9 '14 at 15:01
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    I think you are confusing a lot of different concepts. – Double AA Sep 9 '14 at 16:12
  • the halachic definition of a receptacle is the same in mikvaot and bishul. It's the same concept. – Jake Sep 9 '14 at 18:08

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