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Genesis 2:7 And the Lord G-d formed man of the dust of the ground vs. :19 And out of the ground the Lord G-d formed every beast of the field

I just want to know the difference between "the dust of the ground" and "the ground" in Hebrew, and if is two different words that are used and what they are.

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    Alma Orraca, welcome to Mi Yodeya, and thanks for bringing this interesting question here! I am gratified to see that you got a couple of useful answers within a few hours of posting the question. I hope you'll survey the grounds and find other material of interest. For example, you can find more questions about Genesis' account of the Creation in the tag parashat-bereishit. – Isaac Moses Sep 2 '14 at 16:11
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Rashi explains that man was created by Gcd collection ground from all over the world, forming it into the shape of man and then breathing life into it.

Hence in Genesis 2:7 it says And the Lord G-d formed man of the dust of the ground - dust from all over the world.

In Genesis 2:19 And out of the ground the Lord G-d formed every beast of the field teaches us that animals were created from the ground where they materialized, but not by collecting ground from all over the world.

As an aside: a reason for man being created from all over the world is, that wherever he or his descendants subsequently die, the ground will be willing to accept them for burial as "one of its own".

  • Which midrash is it? – user613 Sep 3 '14 at 3:50
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    @user3949142 - it's actually a Rashi. צבר עפרו מכל האדמה, מארבע רוחות, שבכל מקום שימות שם, תהא קולטתו לקבורה. – Danny Schoemann Sep 3 '14 at 11:11
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I just want to know the difference between "the dust of the ground" and "the ground" in Hebrew, and if is two different words that are used and what they are.

Here, "of the dust of the ground" is "עָפָר מִן הָאֲדָמָה", but the first "of" is implied, so "the dust of the ground" is "עָפָר מִן הָאֲדָמָה". And, in verse 19, "the ground" is "הָאֲדָמָה".

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