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Maimonides theorized in his "Guide to the Perplexed" that Hashem did not favor korbanot (animal sacrifices), but allowed them due to the difficulty changing the nature of people. This is in the context of Israel being captive and accustomed to Egyptian ways. The concept of G-d being "reluctant" suggests He did something with hesitation and doubt. How could G-d be in conflict and doubt? Why would G-d "think" Israel couldn't possibly eradicate their pagan-like origins?

I understand that many rabbinic authorities opposed (and continue to do so) Rambam's view on this matter. How did he reconcile this concept with the restoration of the Third Temple during messianic times and the reintroduction of mandatory daily sacrifices? Today, most westerners, including Jews, see animal sacrifices as backwards, kapporos notwithstanding. Hashem didn't foresee this?

  • -1 why would you assume the Halacha would change even if the original reason is no longer present? – Double AA Aug 4 '14 at 23:10
  • hebrewbooks.org/… – Double AA Aug 4 '14 at 23:13
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    @doubleaa. I resent your down vote. This is an excellent question. It was my understanding that it was Maimonides view that G-d did not want animal sacrifices but he "allowed" them very reluctantly. The concept behind "reluctant" suggests something done with hesitation and doubt. How could G-d be in conflict and doubt? Why would G-d "think" Israel couldn't possibly eradicate their pagan-like origins? – JJLL Aug 4 '14 at 23:23
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    I like the question in your comment so +1 to that. It is not the same as the one in the above post. – Double AA Aug 4 '14 at 23:27
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    Possible duplicate of Maimonides and Sacrifices as G-d's concession to Mankind – Alex Feb 19 at 19:26

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