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I've seen the word Hashem hyphenated ("Hash-m"). Is there any valid reason for this practice?

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  • 1
    Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/83/…
    – Shmuel
    May 29 '13 at 20:41
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    What do you mean validity? Are you asking if the practice is permitted? Do you want to know if it accomplishes something? What? If it avoids something? What?
    – Double AA
    May 29 '13 at 20:54
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The names of Hashem which may not be erased are listed in Shulchan Oruch Yoreh Daioh 276 (9).

Hashem is not one of them and so the hyphenated ("Hash-m") seems unnecessary.

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    The name "Hashem" was not around when the Shulchan Aruch was written so this is not a proof.
    – Double AA
    May 29 '13 at 22:09
  • @DoubleAA maybe it is. Maybe the SA's list is all-inclusive, so "God", "Hashem", and the like can be erased. That's what the wording of the SA sounds like to me.
    – msh210
    May 30 '13 at 2:48
  • @msh210 maybe. but you have to show that he meant it to be conclusive. You can't just argue from silence, as this post does.
    – Double AA
    May 30 '13 at 3:19
  • @DoubleAA but Hakadosh Baruch Hu was. Jun 27 '13 at 2:48
  • @Shmuel No it wasn't. הקדוש ברוך הוא might have been.
    – Double AA
    Jun 27 '13 at 3:59
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Hashem is what we use in place of one of the Aibishter's holy names. It simply means The Name. Perhaps people generalize from the examples of G-d and L-rd, and replace the e with a hyphen.

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    Welcome to Mi Yodeya, Jay Marme, and thanks for your suggestion. I hope you look around at our other questions, read about the site, and stick around.
    – msh210
    Jun 27 '13 at 7:10

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