5

Many North African Jews celebrate the day after Pesach (which is Isru Chag) with the festive Mimouna. Does such a party atmosphere conflict with the customs of mourning during sefirat haomer? Could one just as well get a haircut on that day?

More specifically, is Isru Chag not included in the mourning customs of sefirat haomer?

  • Many hold that the mourning customs do not start until after Rosh Chodesh. In fact I know someone who is getting married on the day after Pesach. There are about 4 different customs for the days - I'll see if I can get a list and post them in an answer. – Ariel Mar 31 '13 at 16:15
  • @Ariel I assume the question is for those who do start before Rosh Chodesh, is Isru Chag included or not? (I don't know the answer.) – Liron Apr 2 '13 at 4:59
  • Similar: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/15942 – msh210 Apr 4 '13 at 22:10
1

More specifically, is Isru Chag not included in the mourning customs of sefirat haomer?

Aruch Hashulchan 493:4 cites, if I'm reading him right, "various customs about [the restrictions of these days]. Some have practiced a prohibition from immediately after Pesach until the 33d of the omer and from then on weddings and haircuts are permitted, because a midrash has it that fifteen days before Shavuos [the students of Rabi Akiva] stopped dying, so that 34 days are left; it would have been logical to practice the prohibition until the 35th of the count, but we say part of the day is like its whole, so [these things are] permitted on the day of the 34th and not earlier.... [And others keep the second 'half'.]" (Emphasis added.)

  • You're suggesting that we apply Miktzas haYom keKullo to Isru Chag? – Double AA Mar 31 '13 at 15:48
  • @DoubleAA, I'm not. – msh210 Mar 31 '13 at 17:00
1

The mourning restrictions during sefira include not getting married, or taking a haircut. I see no reason why a person would have any trouble adhering to these restrictions during Mimouna. For those who hold the "first days" of sefira, the restrictions begin immediately after Pesach.

  • 1
    Welcome to Judaism.SE and thank you for your answer! – andrewmh20 Apr 3 '13 at 3:50
0

(In chronological order of the start day.)

Option 1:

Mourn starting from the first day of Pesach, and continue till Lag Baomer. Total days: 33.

Option 2:

Mourn starting from the first day of the omer (2nd day of Pesach), and continue till the 34th day of the omer, skipping Lag Baomer. Total days: 33.

Option 3:

Mourn starting from the day after Pesach, and continue till Shavuot, skipping Lag Baomer, Shabbos, and the 3 days of Rosh Chodesh. Total days: 32 (33 in Israel).

Option 4:

Mourn starting from the day after Pesach, and continue till Shavuot, skipping Lag Baomer, Shabbos, and the 3 days before Shavuot (sheloshet yemei hagbalah). Total days: 32 (33 in Israel).

Option 5:

Mourn starting from the first day of Rosh Chodesh Iyar (30th of Nissan), and continue till the day before Shavuot, skipping Lag Baomer. Total days: 33.

Option 6:

Mourn starting from 1 Iyar, and continue till Shavuot, skipping Lag Baomer. Total days: 33.

(The pattern of 33 days is assuming Roch Chodech doesn't fall on Shabbos. I believe Lag Baomer can't fall on Shabbos.)

  • 1
    Can you put sources for the various opinions? Also I would include a 7th, Start morning from first day of the Omer and continue until Shavuot, not skipping at all. Source Kitvei HaAri Shaar HaKavvanot 86d. – Rabbi Michael Tzadok Apr 2 '13 at 3:30
  • I thought that Minhag Chabad was to actually start from the first day of the Omer and go to Shavuot (I guess 3 days before Shavuot) which adds up to 33 days not counting Lag BaOmer, Chol HaMoed, Yom Tov or Shabbat, which is effectively Option 4 above only phrased differently. [Not my minhag.] – Liron Apr 2 '13 at 4:58

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .