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In a case of a gezera or any other issur that might not apply to a particular person (for whatever reason) we often still say it does because of a "lo plog". In order that we shouldn't make differences and exceptions in a gezera that was made or in a case of a particular issur.

What is an example of a "lo plog" from Shas?

What is an example of a case where we should apply the rule of a "lo plog" however we don't?

(I have not provided any examples in my question because that's exactly what I'm looking for a "classic" example that is found in Shas. As well as an example where we find that really we should say "lo plog" but we don't.)

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    I believe the phrase you are looking for is "לא פלוג רבנן", or "lo palug rabanan" - our rabbis do not differentiate. Yad Malachi כללי הש"ס 'ל' כלל שנז considers Eruvin 65b to be a classic example. – WAF Feb 27 '13 at 23:38
  • @WAF why not make this an answer? – Yehoshua Feb 28 '13 at 6:07
  • I didn't think it had enough substance to it, but here I go. . . – WAF Mar 1 '13 at 1:08
  • @WAF you're right, I made that commment pretty quick after seeing yours... Any others? – Yehoshua Mar 1 '13 at 6:03
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I believe the phrase you are looking for is "לא פלוג רבנן", or "lo palug rabanan" - our rabbis do not differentiate. Yad Malachi כללי הש"ס 'ל' כלל שנז considers Eruvin 65b to be a classic example.

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See Tosfos (hacha)in shabbas 45b about using an animal for a baby.

  • That case is a lo plug.It is not clear what type of lo plug you want? – sam Mar 4 '13 at 3:29
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    Summarizing this would be helpful. – Seth J Mar 4 '13 at 14:23

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