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The Rambam in Hilchos Yesodei HaTorah says God has no joy or sadness. If so, why do we wait for moshiach? For G-d's glory? G-d does not need anything from us.

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    This question could be extended to doing anything for Hashem. How does it benefit Him in anyway and why does He care? As it says in Iyov: אם חטאת מה תפעל בו ורבו פשעיך מה תעשה לו, אם צדקת מה תתן לו או מה מידך יקח – Michoel Sep 10 '12 at 12:25
  • I think Gd imagines us, just like we imagine things. We don't need to imagine, we don't necessarily want to imagine, either, it's just something we do. We are figments of Gd's imagination, so to speak. He has written the story already, on a plane outside of time. We're just actors in the greatest most detailed fairy tale that ever was. And part of what makes the most amazing story is that it's spans the very dimensions of existence, including humans, demons, angels, and Gd Himself, who made himself relatable to us through Torah, so that we could involve Him in the epic. – user3114 Sep 11 '13 at 21:58
  • So, yea ultimately, there is no real purpose,but this is our whole purpose, as koheles says. Bring Gd into this world by loving him and fearing him, because that's why we're here. It's part of the imagined reality in which we live, which exists as just that. Mashiach is the end of the story: the climax and the falling action. It's the culmination of our purpose! Yay! By bringing mashiach we'll become as meaningful and awesome aswe ever could be, which is pretty darn special :) – user3114 Sep 11 '13 at 22:01
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Rambam himself states why great Jews wait for mashiach, in Hilkhot Melakhim (12:7):

לא נתאוו הנביאים והחכמים ימות המשיח--לא כדי שישלטו על כל העולם, ולא כדי שירדו בגויים, ולא כדי שינשאו אותם העמים, ולא כדי לאכול ולשתות ולשמוח: אלא כדי שיהיו פנויין בתורה וחכמתה, ולא יהיה להם נוגש ומבטל, כדי שיזכו לחיי העולם הבא, כמו שביארנו בהלכות תשובה

The prophets and the wise men only desired the messianic age...So that they be free [to pursue] Torah and its wisdom. (My translation of the bolded portion).

Rambam avoids the question entirely, by not saying that the waiting is for God's sake, but for our sake.

  • good point.+1 i see the question was poorly formulated. asking according to those opinions that it is for God, such as "l'akma shechinta m'afra" – ray Dec 18 '16 at 17:59
  • @ray Thank you. Considering it is too late to edit the question, consider asking a separate question about the point of mashiach according to those opinions that you reference. – mevaqesh Dec 18 '16 at 19:14
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This excellent article by Rabbi Aron Moss explains why G-d created the world if He is perfect and lacks nothing. The crunch of it is that G-d does not need us, but he want us. The only thing G-d did not have before creating the world was a relationship with someone else (because there was nothing else but Him). Moshiach is the epitome of our relationship with G-d.

For further reading I would recommend this lengthier article by Rabbi Tzvi Freeman "What is the Purpose of Existence?", and this collection of articles on the topic of G-d's purpose in creating the world.

  • Are you saying God was lacking in some way? – Double AA Sep 10 '12 at 16:32
  • @DoubleAA Absolutely not. – Michoel Sep 10 '12 at 20:55
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    Then why does He want something? – Double AA Sep 10 '12 at 22:46
  • @DoubleAA This is a huge discussion in hashkafa/chassidus. (It should be, after all it's the core of our existence). On one foot, when someone wants something, that supersedes logic and thus defies explanation, but I would recommend reading the articles I edited into my answer for a more comprehensive explanation. – Michoel Sep 11 '12 at 0:02
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    I don't see any reference to Moshiach in that article. Btw, if logic doesn't apply, then couldn't God have had an interpersonal relationship even before creating other people? – Double AA Apr 10 '13 at 4:50

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