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There are a number of heating pads on the market for heat therapy cures and general warmth in the winter. Some are electric, but some of them need to be heated in a microwave or an oven. If you heat one of these things in a non-Kosher oven or microwave, can you later heat it in your own Kosher oven or microwave? Assume that the heating mechanism has not been specifically cleaned for this purpose (it might not be covered in splattered food, but assume it's not spick and span.

  • If the object is completely dry then I don't know how you can transfer taste to it at all in an oven -- there's no steam! – Double AA Jun 29 '12 at 19:05
  • @DoubleAA Isn't it wet on the inside? AFAIK we don't rely l'chat'chila on taste not transferring between hot, dry surfaces that are touching one another. (Of course CYLOR.) – msh210 Jun 29 '12 at 19:32
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    @msh210 My impression was that we rely on it all the time when double wrapping things to be warmed up. So even if it's not lechatchila, then it must be very easy to define shaat hadechak for this purpose. – Double AA Jun 29 '12 at 21:51
  • Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/62318/… – SAH Jan 24 '16 at 0:40
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Yes, you may.

It is a completely dry and not-fatty (anyone have a better word for כחוש?) item and therefore emits nothing that can render something else not kosher. See the first Shach and Taz in YD §108, and the Rema ibid.

  • Isn't it wet on the inside, like a pot? AFAIK we don't rely l'chat'chila on taste not transferring between hot, dry surfaces that are touching one another. – msh210 Jun 29 '12 at 19:33
  • @msh210 We don't cook two pots next to each other because of a chumra, that stuff might splash from one pot to the other (even though the Gemara AZ 12a permits it). There is no room for such a chumra when it isn't possible to splash, such as in this case. – Dov F Jun 29 '12 at 19:38

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