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I am looking for sources allowing to pray mincha right before Shkia and Maariv right after (assume that the plag is either before when mincha is recited or after maariv, which is probably what happens most often in these cases).

The issue at hand is that the Shulchan Aruch and Rema 233:1 rule that if one wants to daven Maariv before Tzait Hakochavim (nightfall) one has to daven Mincha before the plag.

I am assuming that if one would strictly follow the ruling that Tzais Hakochavim is very soon after Shkia one could consider the time from shkia to that nightfall to be bein hashmashot and as such Safek night. This would then mean that davening maariv in that time is allowed because it might already be night and unrelated to Siman 233:1. But given that the minhag (basing this on when people light menorah if they wait for Tzais or when people count sefirah etc.) is to consider Tzais Hakochavim at a later time, probably between 40-72 minutes, this thought will not work anymore.

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  • Who said arvit after sunset is early (even if it's not night, which it isn't)?
    – Double AA
    Commented Jun 25 at 21:28
  • "davening maariv in that time is allowed because it might already be night" The logic as you've presented only implies it might be allowed not that it is.
    – Double AA
    Commented Jun 25 at 21:35
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    "rule that if one wants to daven Maariv early one has to daven Mincha before the plag" This is not remotely precise, to the point of being misleading
    – Double AA
    Commented Jun 25 at 21:48
  • @DoubleAA I must be really reading 233 wrong, can you please enlighten me.
    – Yoreinu
    Commented Jun 25 at 21:59
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    Btw it's well documented that the rules you are discussing were rarely followed historically. There are dozens of sources testifying to and justifying the practice. Is that all you seek? Or do you have some reason to think this practice does conform to the Shulchan Aruch that you ask about it specifically?
    – Double AA
    Commented Jun 25 at 22:17

1 Answer 1

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I am looking for sources allowing to pray mincha right before Shkia and Maariv right after.

It's in the Shulchan Aruch you refer to (233:1) which says:

ועכשיו שנהגו להתפלל תפלת המנחה עד הלילה אין להתפלל תפלת ערבית קודם שקיעת החמה

And nowadays that the custom is to pray Mincha until nightfall, one should not pray Maariv before sunset.

But after sunset you can daven Maariv.

The Shulchan Aruch then continues:

ואם בדיעבד התפלל תפלת ערבית מפלג המנחה ולמעלה יצא
ובשעת הדחק יכול להתפלל תפלת ערבית מפלג המנחה ולמעלה

If you did pray Maariv after Plag you are Yotze (fulfilled your obligation),
and in a pinch you can pray Maariv after Plag.

Presumably (since this is the end of the previous sentence quoted above) he's referring to those who already prayed Mincha after Plag, and now he allows them - reluctantly - to pray Maariv even before sunset.

I don't see the Rema arguing about this.

BTW: If you look in the first Tosafos in Shas you will see that it was common practice to pray both Mincha and Maariv between Plag and sunset.

אנו מתפללין ערבית מיד לאחר פלג המנחה משום דקיימא לן דשעת המנחה כלה כדברי רבי יהודה ומיד הוי זמן ערבית ובזמן התפלה (של מנחה) עצמה לא קיימא לן כרבי יהודה אלא כרבנן.‏

On Daf 26b, Tosafot (יעקב תקן תפלת ערבית) lauds our practice of praying Maariv before sunset.

ויפה מנהג שלנו דאדרבה טוב להתפלל מבעוד יום קצת:‏

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    When the mechaber says to wait for shekia, he's quite likely referring to the so-called "second" shekia - i.e. 15 or so minutes before tzeit hakochavim, not what we would call sunset today. See MB there (9) who makes this point, and then goes on to claim that the mechaber is being imprecise and agrees that one really needs to wait for tzeit hakochavim for maariv.
    – Joel K
    Commented Jun 26 at 12:50
  • Tosafot doesn't say before sunset
    – Double AA
    Commented Jun 26 at 13:25

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