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Tehillim are poems/songs. Yet, they do not follow the standard patterns for poetry and music that we are used to i.e. they rarely rhyme, they rarely have a consistent rhythm, etc.

I don't expect "music" written 3000 years ago to be similar to what I am used to, but I do seek to understand why they are written the way they are.

We do sing some of them today, with our own niggunim (tunes), and it works. Yet at the same time, my mind does question why rhythm and rhyme are so rare; seemingly such little value placed on them. Is there a specific reason for this, or is this just one of those questions that doesn't get off the ground because it is too contemporary- and western- centric?

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  • Tehillim were written with their own music that we no longer know.
    – Dude
    Mar 31 at 0:45
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    Some questions to help you narrow your focus: What do you mean by the way they are? Why ask about rhyme and rhythm if you don't expect old poetry to conform to that? Do you have any exposure to other old poetry to which you wish to compare tehillim?
    – magicker72
    Mar 31 at 2:07
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    this just one of those questions that doesn't get off the ground because it is too contemporary- and western- centric.
    – N.T.
    Mar 31 at 9:09
  • "Tehillim are poems/songs." - What's your source for the "poems" which is the basis for your question... Mar 31 at 12:11

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